Treasure Island

Front Cover
Signet Classic, 1998 - Fiction - 224 pages
3 Reviews
For sheer storytelling delight and pure adventure, Treasure Island has never been surpassed. From young Jim Hawkin's first encounter with the sinister Blind Pew to the climactic battle with the most memorable villain in literature, Long John Silver, this novel has fired readers' imaginations for generations. More than a rousing tale of treachery, greed, and daring, Treasure Island is, in the words of G. K. Chesterton, "the realisation of an ideal, that which is promised in its provocative and beckoning map; a vision not only of white skeletons but also green palm trees and sapphire seas." Original and thoroughly engaging, Treasure Island continues to appeal to young and old alike. A new introduction by R.H.W. Dillard offers a modern perspective on the timeless themes of this classic story, illuminating its relevance to today's readers.

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About the author (1998)

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh in 1850. The son of a prosperous civil engineer, he was expected to follow the family profession, but was allowed to study law at Edinburgh University. Stevenson reacted strongly against the Presbyterian respectability of the city's professional classes and this led to painful clashes with his parents. In his early twenties he became afflicted with a severe respiratory illness from which he was to suffer for the rest of his life; it was at this time that he determined to become a professional writer. The effects of the often harsh Scottish climate on his poor health forced him to spend long periods abroad. After a great deal of travelling he eventually settled in Samoa, where he died on 3 December 1894.

Stevenson's Calvinistic upbringing gave him a preoccupation with pre-destination and a fascination with the presence of evil. In Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde he explores the darker side of the human psyche, and the character of the Master in The Master of Ballantrae (1889) was intended to be 'all I know of the Devil'. Stevenson is well known for his novels of historical adventure, including Treasure Island (1883), Kidnapped (1886) and Catriona (1893). As Walter Allen comments in The English Novel, 'His rediscovery of the art of narrative, of conscious and cunning calculation in telling a sto

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