Proceedings of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society of London

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Page 108 - Thompson's absence from the Hospital. In these four cases the disease was in the third stage. In two, a remarkable reduction in the rapidity of the pulse, amounting to about twenty beats, occurred under the use of the ozonized oil, while the improvement induced could not be referred to any other cause. Dr. Alison remarks, " I attach some value to this observation ; for I prescribed the oil totally divested of all prejudice in its favour, and I have always been reluctant on imperfect grounds to refer...
Page 271 - This is not often seen as an independent affection, but in lungs which are the seat of the second form it occasionally exists in small patches along the margins of the lobes. These patches resemble small vesicles, and when numerous have somewhat the appearance of a row of beads. 2. Lobular Emphysema. — This is the form most frequently met with. It involves one or more lobules in different parts of the lung, and is especially found along- the margins of the base, the anterior border, and at the...
Page 84 - In illustration, the author cited the increase in the loss of weight in the prisoners at Wakefield when tea was added to their food. The action of tea has been hitherto misunderstood, but the sagacious observation of Liebig as to its analogy with the active principle of the bile was much commended. He (Dr. Smith...
Page 385 - With regard to the morbid appearances in case of death of the animals put into the warm bath, compared with those of the animals not so treated: "in the animals put into the bath the lungs were much more congested, more full of blood ; * * both sides of the heart were bloated with blood. In some instances the blood was coagulated in the vessels of the lungs, the systemic veins, and the cavities of the heart.
Page 346 - DR. WILLIAM W. GULL. REPORTS ON EPIDEMIC CHOLERA; its Cause and Mode of Diffusion, Morbid Anatomy, Pathology and Treatment. Drawn up at the desire of the Cholera Committee of the Royal College of Physicians.
Page 107 - June, the author, after some general remarks on the properties of ozone, describes the results obtained from its administration in association with oils ; the oils being ozonized by exposure for a considerable time to the direct rays of the sun, after previous saturation with oxygen gas, according to the process adopted by Mr. Dugald Campbell. The cases of fourteen consumptive patients to whom the ozonized oils were given are detailed ; and the principal facts noted are also appended in a tabular...
Page 94 - The lowest and most appropriate site in which the probe can be felt having been selected, an incision is made upon the end of the probe, which is then brought through the opening thus made. A strong piece of silk thread is passed into the eye of the probe and drawn through the two openings, and the drainage-tube, being firmly tied to one end, is then drawn through by means of the silk.
Page 106 - ... mechanical and physiological effects of this increased length of the tendons were described ; and lastly, the author stated that when recontraction of the foot takes place, and the deformity returns at a distant period after tenotomy, this does not depend upon absorption of the new material, or new tendinous tissue formed previously to unite the divided extremities of the old tendon, but upon structural alterations taking place in the muscular tissue. In three cases of relapsed deformity of the...
Page 118 - He then states that the object of the following paper was to trace out more particularly the connexion, if any, between the height of the thermometer and the excreted amount of these substances ; and he then describes his method of investigation, and the precautions taken against sources of error. His observations •were made on two untreated cases of ague (one of quotidian and one of tertian) in University College Hospital, under the care of Dr. Parkes ; and they are recorded in a series of charts...
Page 93 - A puncture with a trocar, or a simple incision, may be made into the cavity of the chest at the usual place — between the fifth and sixth, or sixth and seventh ribs — or indeed in any convenient situation. A firm long iron probe, somewhat bent, is then passed through the opening, and directed towards the lower and back part of the cavity — the lower the better.

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