Martian Time-Slip

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct 23, 2012 - Fiction - 272 pages
"The writing is humorous, painful, awesome in its effect on both mind and heart . . . There are few modern novels to match it."—Rolling Stone

On an arid Mars, local bigwigs compete with Earth-bound interlopers to buy up land before the UN develops it and its value skyrockets. Martian Union leader Arnie Kott has an ace up his sleeve, though: an autistic boy named Manfred who seems to have the ability to see the future. In the hopes of gaining an advantage on a Martian real estate deal, powerful people force Manfred to send them into the future, where they can learn about development plans. But is Manfred sending them to the real future or one colored by his own dark and paranoid filter? As the time travelers are drawn into Manfred's dark worldview in both the future and present, the cost of doing business may drive them all insane.

 

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User Review  - scottcholstad - LibraryThing

To be honest, I've always been a bit middle of the road on this one. Not nearly as good as his early stuff, but vastly better than his later religious garbage. It's a good tale, but it always creeped ... Read full review

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User Review  - jonfaith - LibraryThing

Mister, they take a brave journey. They turn away from mere things, which one may handle and turn to practical use; they turn inward to meaning. There, the black-night-without-bottom lies, the pit ... Read full review

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Contents

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Back Cover
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About the author (2012)

PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) wrote 121 short stories and 45 novels and is considered one of the most visionary authors of the twentieth century. His work is included in the Library of America and has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Eleven works have been adapted to film, including Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall, Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly.

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