Turtle Geometry: The Computer as a Medium for Exploring Mathematics

Front Cover
MIT Press, 1986 - Computers - 477 pages

Turtle Geometry presents an innovative program of mathematical discovery thatdemonstrates how the effective use of personal computers can profoundly change the nature of astudent's contact with mathematics. Using this book and a few simple computer programs, students canexplore the properties of space by following an imaginary turtle across the screen.The concept ofturtle geometry grew out of the Logo Group at MIT. Directed by Seymour Papert, author of Mindstorms,this group has done extensive work with preschool children, high school students and universityundergraduates. Harold Abelson is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical Engineeringand Computer Science at MIT. Andrea diSessa is an associate professor in the Graduate School ofEducation, University of California, Berkeley.

 

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User Review  - nillacat - LibraryThing

A lovely book on how to think geometrically and algorithmically, using a simple programming language to produce pictures and prove theorems, starting from Eucliedean Geometry and ending with the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction to Turtle Geometry
3
Exercises for Section 1 2
30
Exercises for Section 1 4
50
Exercises for Section 2 3
85
Exercises for Section 2 4
99
Vector Methods in Turtle Geometry
105
Exercises for Section 3 2
135
Topology of Turtle Paths
161
Exploring the Cube
241
A Second Look at the Sphere
279
Exercises for Chapter 7
301
Exercises for Section 8 2
330
Exercises for Section 8 3
338
Exercises for Section 9 2
370
Exercises for Section 9 4
387
Writing Turtle Programs in Conventional Computer
405

Exercises for Section 4 2
179
Exercises for Section 4 3
188
Exercises for Section 4 4
198
Exercises for Section 5 3
235
Hints for Selected Exercises
423
Answers to Selected Exercises
439
Index
471
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Hal Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a fellow of the IEEE. He is a founding director of Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, and the Free Software Foundation. Additionally, he serves as co-chair for the MIT Council on Educational Technology.

Andrea diSessa is Chancellor's Professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, and a member of the National Academy of Education. He is the coauthor of Turtle Geometry: The Computer as a Medium for Exploring Mathematics (MIT Press, 1981).

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