Works of the Camden Society, Volume 32

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Camden Society, 1845 - Great Britain
 

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Page iii - T. CROFTON CROKER, ESQ. FSA, MRIA SIR HENRY ELLIS, KH, FRS, Sec. SA THE REV. JOSEPH HUNTER, FSA PETER LEVESQUE, ESQ. FSA SIR FREDERIC MADDEN, KH, FRS, FSA THOMAS JOSEPH PETTIGREW, ESQ.
Page 166 - I shall always take care to defend and support it. I know too, that the laws of England are sufficient to make the King as great a Monarch as I can wish : and as I shall never depart from the just rights and prerogative of the Crown, so I shall never invade any man's property.
Page 86 - A soldier told us, He was four miles off. I said, it was unreasonable to carry us out of our way ; if Mr Cromwell had been there, I should have willingly given him all the satisfaction he could desire ; — and putting my hand into my pocket, I gave one of them Twelvepence, who said, we might pass. By this I saw plainly it would not be possible for my Father to get to the King with his coach ; ' ' — neither did he go at all, but stayed at home till he died.
Page 189 - My Lord, if you be of the Church of England, you must acknowledge the doctrine of non-resistance to be true.
Page 67 - ... when the good and safety of the kingdom in general is concerned, and the whole kingdom in danger (of which His Majesty is the only judge), then the charge of the defence ought to be borne by all the realm in general. This I hold agreeably both to law and reason.
Page 165 - I shall make it my endeavour to preserve this government, both in church and state, as it is now by law established.
Page 192 - My Lord, you have been bred a soldier : you will do a generous, Christian thing, if you please to go to the rail, and speak to the soldiers; and say, that here you stand, a sad example of rebellion, and entreat them and the people to be loyal and obedient to the King. M. I have said I will make no speeches: I will make no speeches: I come to die.
Page 36 - Cary went alonge with vs, and passinge ouer the mountains Pen Men Maure, in the narrow passage wee met a gentleman, of whome Mr. Fountain and Sir Thomas inquired how the tyde was, whoe told them we might pass well if wee made hast, soe they putt on, wee followinge, not knowinge what had passed.
Page 6 - Serjeants, there was not tyme for readings, that manie fitt had binn on the King's side in the warr, and either wanted monie or were to be indulged, etc. ; yet readings were inioyned, and some read that found noe advantage. Formerly, they read constantly a fortnight, since but a week, and at this tyme readings are totally in all the Inns of Court layd aside ; and to speake truth, with great reason, for it was a step once to the dignitie of a serjeant, but not soe now...
Page 188 - of me, that I would rather dy a thousand deaths then to excuse any thing I have don, if I did not realy think myself the most in the rong that ever any man was, and had not from the bottom of my hart an obhorance for those that put me upon it, and for the action it self. I hope. Sr- God Almighty will...

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