King and Messiah as Son of God: Divine, Human, and Angelic Messianic Figures in Biblical and Related Literature

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Nov 3, 2008 - Religion - 261 pages

This book traces the history of the idea that the king and later the messiah is Son of God, from its origins in ancient Near Eastern royal ideology to its Christian appropriation in the New Testament.

Both highly regarded scholars, Adela Yarbro Collins and John J. Collins argue that Jesus was called "the Son of God" precisely because he was believed to be the messianic king. This belief and tradition, they contend, led to the identification of Jesus as preexistent, personified Wisdom, or a heavenly being in the New Testament canon. However, the titles Jesus is given are historical titles tracing back to Egyptian New Kingdom ideology. Therefore the title "Son of God" is likely solely messianic and not literal. King and Messiah as Son of God is distinctive in its range, spanning both Testaments and informed by ancient Near Eastern literature and Jewish noncanonical literature.

 

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Contents

1 The King as Son of God
15
2 The Kingship in Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Literature
39
3 Messiah and Son of God in the Hellenistic Period
62
4 Messiah and Son of Man
89
5 Jesus as Messiah and Son of God in the Letters of Paul
115
6 Jesus as Messiah and Son of God in the Synoptic Gospels
137
7 Jesus as Son of Man
163
8 Messiah Son of God and Son of Man in the Gospel and Revelation of John
189
Conclusion
218
Bibliography
228
Index of Modern Authors
255
Index of Scripture and Other Ancient Literature
264
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

John J. Collins is Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale Divinity School. His many other books include The Apocalyptic Imagination: Annbsp;Introduction tonbsp;Jewish Apocalyptic Literature, Early Judaism: Anbsp;Comprehensive Overview, and The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature.

John J. Collins is Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale Divinity School. His many other books include The Apocalyptic Imagination: An Introduction to Jewish Apocalyptic Literature, Early Judaism: A Comprehensive Overview, and The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature.

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