New Principles of Gunnery: Containing the Determination of the Force of Gun-powder, and an Investigation of the Difference in the Resisting Power of the Air to Swift and Slow Motions. With Several Other Tracts on the Improvement of Practical Gunnery

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F. Wingrave, 1805 - Ballistics - 341 pages
 

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Page 341 - I shall therefore close this paper with predicting, that whatever State shall thoroughly comprehend the nature and advantages of rifled barrel pieces, and, having facilitated and completed their construction, shall introduce into their armies their general use with a dexterity in the management of them ; they will by this means acquire a superiority, which will almost equal anything that has been done at any time by the particular excellence of any one kind of arms; and will perhaps fall but little...
Page xxvi - An Address to the Electors and other free subjects of Great Britain, occasioned by the late Succession ; in which is contained a particular account of all our negotiations with Spain, and their treatment of us for above ten years past.
Page xli - I forgot to ask you whether you intended to publish the second volume of my voyage before you leave us ; which I confess 1 am very sorry for. If you should have laid aside all thoughts of favouring the world with more of your works it will be much disappointed, and no one in it more than your very obliged humble servant,
Page 337 - And the powder and bullet are put in ' through the side of the barrel by an opening, which, when the piece is loaded, is filled up with a- screw. By this means, when the piece is fired,, the bullet is forced through the rifles, and acquires, the same spiral motion as in the former kind of pieces.
Page 330 - And (which is still of more importance) if, by the casual irregularity of the foremost surface of the bullet, or by any other accident, the resistance should be stronger on one side of the pole of...
Page 80 - ... bullets instead of one) a greater quantity of powder would necessarily be fired, since a heavier weight would be a longer time in passing through the barrel. Whence it should follow, that two or three bullets would be impelled by a much greater force than one only. But the contrary to this appears by experiment ; for firing one, two, and three bullets, laid contiguous to each other, with the same charge respectively, I have found (by a method to be mentioned hereafter) that their velocities were...
Page 203 - P was fixed to it; this smaller weight being taken from M, the remainder is obviously equal in effort to the resistance of the revolving body P ; and this remainder being reduced in the ratio of the length of the, arm to the semidiameter of the barrel, will then become equal to the absolute quantity of the resistance. And as the time of one revolution is known, and consequently the velocity of the revolving body ; there is thereby discovered, the absolute quantity of the resistance to the given body...
Page 338 - For if such a bullet hath its shorter axis made to fit the piece, and it be placed in the barrel with its smaller end downwards ; then it will acquire by the rifles a rotation round its larger axis; and its centre of gravity lying nearer to its fore part than its hinder part, its longer axis will be constantly forced by the resistance of the air 'into the line of its flight. As we see, .that by the same mean§ arrows constantly lie in the line of their direction, .however that line be iucurvated.
Page 87 - ... being ascertained, that, multiplied by 505, will give the velocity with which the ball impinged. " But the velocity of the point of oscillation after the stroke is easily deduced from the chord of the arch, through which it ascends by the blow ; for it is a well-known proposition, that all pendulous bodies ascend to the same height by their vibratory motion, as they would do if they were projected directly upwards from their lowest...
Page 217 - ... it is not my business at present to enlarge, nor have I indeed as yet completed all the experiments, , I have projected on this subject. However, thus far may be easily concluded, that all the theories of resistance hitherto established, are extremely defective, and that it is only by experiments analogous to' those here recited, that this important subject can ever be completed : I say important subject; for surely a matter, on the right knowledge of which all true speculations on ship-building...

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