The Wal-Mart Effect: How the World's Most Powerful Company Really Works--and HowIt's Transforming the American Economy

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Penguin, Jan 19, 2006 - Business & Economics - 352 pages
3 Reviews
Wal-Mart isn’t just the world’s biggest company, it is probably the world’s most written-about. But no book until this one has managed to penetrate its wall of silence or go beyond the usual polemics to analyze its actual effects on its customers, workers, and suppliers. Drawing on unprecedented interviews with former Wal-Mart executives and a wealth of staggering data (e.g., Americans spend $36 million an hour at Wal-Mart stores, and in 2004 its growth alone was bigger than the total revenue of 469 of the Fortune 500), The Wal-Mart Effect is an intimate look at a business that is dramatically reshaping our lives.
 

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The Wal-Mart Effect : How the World's Most Powerful Company Really Works--and How It's Transforming the American Economy

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Whether you love or hate Wal-Mart, you canƒ¯‚¿‚½t avoid reading about it. Considering that at least seven titles on the retailing behemoth were published just in 2005, what else could there be ... Read full review

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A powerful study of Wal-Mart's history and the methodical methods leading to it's success. This book offers both praise and warning about the industrial juggernaut, shedding light on how it's wake affects it's workers, suppliers, and even national economies.

Contents

MAKING SPRINKLERS
GETTING WORRIED
GETTING FIRED
A Note on Sources
Sam Waltons TenPound Bass
Makin Bacon a WalMart Fairy Tale
The Squeeze
The Man Who Said No to WalMart
What Do We Actually Know About WalMart?
Salmon Shirts and the Meaning of Low Prices
The Power of Pennies
WalMart and the Decent Society
Peoria September 2005
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About the author (2006)

Charles Fishman has been a senior editor at the Orlando Sentinel and the News & Observer and is now a senior editor at Fast Company. In 2005 he won the prestigious Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism.

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