Symbiosis as a Source of Evolutionary Innovation: Speciation and Morphogenesis

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University of Massachusetts Amherst Massachusetts Lynn Margulis, Lynn Margulis, René Fester
MIT Press, 1991 - Science - 454 pages
These original contributions by symbiosis biologists and evolutionary theorists address the adequacy of the prevailing neo-Darwinian concept of evolution in the light of growing evidence that hereditary symbiosis, supplemented by the gradual accumulation of heritable mutation, results in the origin of new species and morphological novelty.A departure from mainstream biology, the idea of symbiosis--as in the genetic and metabolic interactions of the bacterial communities that became the earliest eukaryotes and eventually evolved into plants and animals--has attracted the attention of a growing number of scientists.These original contributions by symbiosis biologists and evolutionary theorists address the adequacy of the prevailing neo-Darwinian concept of evolution in the light of growing evidence that hereditary symbiosis, supplemented by the gradual accumulation of heritable mutation, results in the origin of new species and morphological novelty. They include reports of current research on the evolutionary consequences of symbiosis, the protracted physical association between organisms of different species. Among the issues considered are individuality and evolution, microbial symbioses, animal-bacterial symbioses, and the importance of symbiosis in cell evolution, ecology, and morphogenesis. Lynn Margulis, Distinguished Professor of Botany at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, is the modern originator of the symbiotic theory of cell evolution. Once considered heresy, her ideas are now part of the microbiological revolution. ContributorsPeter Atsatt, Richard C. Back, David Bermudes, Paola Bonfante-Fasolo, René Fester, Lynda J. Goff, Anne-Marie Grenier, Ricardo Guerrero, Robert H. Haynes, Rosmarie Honegger, Gregory Hinkle, Kwang W. Jeon, Bryce Kendrick, Richard Law, David Lewis, Lynn Margulis, John Maynard Smith, Margaret J. McFall-Ngai, Paul Nardon, Kenneth H. Nealson, Kris Pirozynski, Peter W. Price, Mary Beth Saffo, Jan Sapp, Silvano Scannerini, Werner Schwemmler, Sorin Sonea, Toomas H. Tiivel, Robert K. Trench, Russell Vetter
 

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Contents

Symbiogenesis and Symbionticism
1
Microbial Symbioses
13
Symbiosis and Cytoplasmic
15
A Darwinian View of Symbiosis
26
Modes of Mutation and Repair in Evolutionary Rhythms
40
Origins and Evolution
57
Symbiosis Inferred from the Fossil Record
72
Daptobacter
106
Symbiogenesis in Insects as a Model for Morphogenesis Cell
178
Nematodes
205
Fungal Symbioses and Evolutionary Innovations
249
Development over 3 8 Billion Years
262
Bacteria and Bacterialike Objects in Endomycorrhizal Fungi
273
Mutualistic Symbioses in the Origin and Evolution of Land
288
Fungi and the Origin of Land Plants
301
Symbiosis and Morphogenesis
319

Symbiont Acquisition and Possible
118
Symbiosis in Cell Evolution
129
Status of the Theory of the Symbiotic Origin of Undulipodia
135
Cyanophora paradoxa Korschikoff and the Origins
143
The Role
153
InsectBacteria
170
Symbiosis Interspecific Gene Transfer and the Evolution
341
Galls Flowers Fruits and Fungi
364
Adaptive
381
Lessons
410
About the Authors
431
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

René Fester is a graduate student in the biological sciences at Northern Arizona University.

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