THE STUDENT'S MANUAL

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Page 205 - swallowed what came, And the puff of a dunce, he mistook it for fame ; Till, his relish grown callous almost to disease, Who peppered the highest was surest to please. But let us be candid, and speak out our mind : If dunces applauded, he paid them in kind.
Page 205 - Till, his relish grown callous almost to disease, Who peppered the highest was surest to please. But let us be candid, and speak out our mind : If dunces applauded, he paid them in kind." It is nearly impossible to treat any sacred subject
Page 75 - The strength of his princely antidote may be gathered from the following closing paragraph of this royal Counterblast. " It is a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the
Page 327 - It was written on a blank page in his Bible, and also inserted in his eighth Discourse before the Society for Asiatic Researches. "The Scriptures contain, independently of a divine origin, more true sublimity, more exquisite beauty, purer morality, more important history, and finer strains both of poetry and
Page 187 - He lived with this woman so long, that he had by her seven sons and seven daughters. He was afterwards reduced to great want, and forced to think of plying in the streets as a porter for his livelihood. One day, as he was walking alone by the sea side, being seized with many melancholy
Page 185 - is far from being improbable. The thought is beautiful, as well as curious. "It is possible that some creatures may think half an hour as long as we do a thousand years, or look upon that space of duration which we call a minute, as an hour, a week, a month, or a whole age.
Page 361 - esteemed by the mass of society ? Where is the sympathy for, the solitary missionary of the cross, as he takes his life in his hand, and goes to the dark places of the earth, full of the habitations of cruelty ? The world laughs at the idea that the earth can be
Page 184 - ceed one another in our minds ; that, for this reason, when we sleep soundly without dreaming, we have no perception of time, or the length of it, while we sleep; and that the moment wherein we leave off to think, till the moment we begin to think again, seems to have no distance.
Page 208 - A Persian, humble servant of the sun, Who, though devout, yet bigotry had none, Hearing a lawyer, grave in his address, With adjurations every word impress, Supposed the man a bishop, or, at least,— God's name so much upon his lips,—a priest,
Page 269 - Writers, of every age, have endeavored to show that pleasure is in us, and not in the objects offered for our amusement. If the soul be happily disposed, every thing becomes a subject of entertainment, and distress will almost want a name. Every occurrence passes in review like the figures of a procession : some may be awkward, others

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