Oil, Wine, and the Cultural Economy of Ancient Greece: From the Bronze Age to the Archaic Era

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 18, 2021 - History - 350 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
"Chapter 1 Introduction "There are two liquids most pleasing to human bodies: inside-wine, outside-oil." -Pliny (23-79 CE), Natural History XIV, 29.150 "It is evident that the country now called Hellas had in ancient times no settled population ... without commerce, without freedom of communication either by land or sea, cultivating no more of their territory than the exigencies of life required, destitute of capital, never planting their land ... " -Thucydides (c. 460-400 BCE), History of the Peloponnesian War, 1.2.1-2 Oil, Wine, and Cultural History in Pre-Classical Greece This book aims to explore the centrality of olive oil and wine in various realms of ancient Greek life and how this interdependence came to exist and persist. Indeed, this book argues that oil and wine can be regarded not just as economic commodities, but cultural commodities that actively shaped the paths of ancient Greek history. Cultural commodities can be defined as things that have become deeply entangled with humans through increasing ties of dependency that are reinforced by a high value constructed within multiple contexts of exchange. On the one hand, expansions and contractions of dependencies between people and oil/wine can be seen by tracing shifting emphases in exchange modes-such as commensal, gift, and commercial exchange-within their social and environmental contexts over the long-term"--
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
OIL AND WINE
96
OIL AND WINE
155
OIL AND WINE
197
OIL AND WINE
245
CULTURAL COMMODITIES AND
298
Notes
315
Bibliography
332
Index
396
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2021)

Catherine E. Pratt is Assistant Professor in the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Western Ontario. Her field work has included Palaikastro on Crete, the Palace of Nestor at Pylos, Mycenae, and the Athenian Agora. She is currently co-director of the Bays of East Attica Regional Survey in Porto Raphti, Greece. Her work has been published in AJA and BSA.

Bibliographic information