A Southern Woman's Story

Front Cover
G. W. Carleton & Company, 1879 - Charities - 192 pages
1 Review
An account of the author's experiences in Richmond hospitals during the Civil War.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

A Southern Woman's Story

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This volume launches the press's new "American Civil War Classics" series. First published in 1879, the book recalls Pember's years as a matron at the Confederate Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, VA ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - It is well we cannot see What the end shall be. Whatsoever is beginning, That is wrought by human skill ; Every daring emanation Of the mind's ambitious will : Every first impulse of passion, Gush of love or twinge of hate ; Every launch upon the waters...
Page 192 - That woman must indeed be hard and gross, who lets one material thought lessen her efficiency. In the midst of suffering and death, hoping with those almost beyond hope in this world; praying by the bedside of the lonely and heartstricken; closing the eyes of boys hardly old enough to realize man's sorrows, much less suffer by man's fierce hate, a woman must soar beyond the conventional modesty considered correct under different circumstances. If the ordeal does not chasten and purify her nature,...
Page 75 - He had remained through all his trials, neat, fresh and hearty, interesting in appearance, and so gentle-mannered and uncomplaining that we all loved him. Supported on his crutches he had walked up and down his ward for the first time since he was wounded, and seemed almost restored. That same night he turned over and uttered an exclamation of pain. Following the nurse to his bed, and turning down the covering, a small jet of blood spurted up. The sharp edge of the splintered bone must have severed...
Page 176 - ... ever been welcome in days of yore, expressing a desire to "call and see them," while the vacant chairs, rendered vacant by Federal bullets, stood by the hearth of the widow and bereaved mother. They could not be made to understand that their presence was painful. There were few men in the city at this time; but the women of the South still fought their battle for them; fought it resentfully, calmly, but silently! Clad in their mourning garments, overcome but hardly subdued, they sat within their...
Page 16 - There was no mistaking the stage-whisper which reached my ears from the open door of the office that morning, as the little contract surgeon passed out and informed a friend he met, in a tone of ill-concealed disgust, that 'one of them had come.
Page 37 - ... 62. The speaker was an up-country Georgian, one of the kind called "Goubers" by the soldiers generally ; lean, yellow, attennuated, with wispy strands of hair hanging over his high, thin cheek-bones. He put out a hand to detain me and the nails were like claws. " Why do you not let the nurse cut your nails?" " Because I aren't got any spoon, and I use them instead.
Page 14 - The natural idea that such a life would be injurious to the delicacy and refinement of a lady — that her nature would become deteriorated and her sensibilities blunted, was rather appalling.
Page 172 - Federal cavalrymen, on horses in splendid condition, riding closely and steadily along. They were well mounted, well accoutered, well fed — a rare sight in Southern streets, — the advance of that vaunted army that for four years had so hopelessly knocked at the gates of the Southern Confederacy. They were some distance in advance of the infantry who followed, quite as well appointed and accoutered as the cavalry. Company after company, regiment after regiment, battalion. after battalion, and...
Page 76 - Only as long as I keep my finger upon this artery." A pause ensued. God alone knew what thoughts hurried through that heart and brain, called so unexpectedly from all earthly hopes and ties. He broke the silence at last. "You can let go — " But I could not. Not if my own life had trembled in the balance. Hot tears rushed to my eyes, a surging sound to my ears, and a deathly coldness to my lips. The pang of obeying him was spared me, and for the first and last time during the trials that surrounded...
Page 177 - There was no stepping aside with affectation to avoid the contact of dress, no feigned humility in giving the inside of the walk : they simply totally ignored their presence. Two particular characteristics followed the army in possession — the circus and booths for the temporary accommodation of itinerant venders. The small speculators...

Bibliographic information