Russian Short Stories from Pushkin to Buida

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Penguin UK, May 26, 2005 - Fiction - 416 pages
26 Reviews
From the reign of the Tsars in the early 19th century to the collapse of the Soviet Union and beyond, the short story has long occupied a central place in Russian culture. Included are pieces from many of the acknowledged masters of Russian literature - including Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, and Solzhenitsyn - alongside tales by long-suppressed figures such as the subversive Kryzhanowsky and the surrealist Shalamov. Whether written in reaction to the cruelty of the bourgeoisie, the bureaucracy of communism or the torture of the prison camps, they offer a wonderfully wide-ranging and exciting representation of one of the most vital and enduring forms of Russian literature.
 

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Review: Russian Short Stories from Pushkin to Buida (Penguin Classics)

User Review  - Joshua - Goodreads

A wonderful anthology of Russian stories from the Romantic period to the years after glasnost. Though many of these stories have been collected before--The Queen of Spades, the Greatcoat, etc.--it ... Read full review

Review: Russian Short Stories from Pushkin to Buida (Penguin Classics)

User Review  - Lilian - Goodreads

Excellent collection from early 19th century to late 20th with interesting and thoughtful intros. I liked it so much I want to make notes on some of the writers. Zoshchenko was hilarious, Platonov moving, Shalomov on the Gulag, no adjective will serve. Read full review

All 14 reviews »

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About the author (2005)

Robert Chandler has translated Sappho and Apollinaire for 'Everyman's Poetry'. His translations from Russian include Pushkin's Dubrovsky, Leskov's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate. With his wife Elizabeth and other colleagues he has co-translated numerous works by Andrey Platonov; two of these - Happy Moscow and Soul - were shortlisted for the Weidenfeld European Translation Prize; another - The Macedonian Officer - won second prize in the 2004 John Dryden Translation Prize.

Robert Chandler has translated Sappho and Apollinaire for 'Everyman's Poetry'. His translations from Russian include Pushkin's Dubrovsky, Leskov's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate. With his wife Elizabeth and other colleagues he has co-translated numerous works by Andrey Platonov; two of these - Happy Moscow and Soul - were shortlisted for the Weidenfeld European Translation Prize; another - The Macedonian Officer - won second prize in the 2004 John Dryden Translation Prize.

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