Annual Report of the State Horticultural Society of Missouri, Volume 39

Front Cover
The Society, 1897 - Fruit-culture
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Page 6 - The constitution provides that "this constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular meeting...
Page 85 - Like the vase, in which roses have once been distilled — You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will. But the scent of the roses will hang round it still.
Page 91 - ... throw Thin shadows on the ground below, Shall fraud and force and iron will Oppress the weak and helpless still ? What shall the tasks of mercy be, Amid the toils, the strifes, the tears Of those who live when length of years Is wasting this...
Page 6 - As soon after each regular annual meeting as possible, the president shall appoint the following standing committees, and they shall be required to give a report in writing, under their respective heads, at the annual and semiannual meetings of the society, of what...
Page 329 - The older gardens were essentially private institutions, but as the rights of the people became more and more recognized, many existing establishments and an increasing number of newly founded ones became, to a greater or less extent, open to the public, either through an admittance fee or without charge. The four main elements of the modern botanical garden have thus been brought into it successively : 1. The utilitarian or economic. 2. The aesthetic. 3. The scientific or biologic. 4. The philanthropic....
Page 329 - ... ground, as well as the desire to cultivate rare or unusual species, and during the eighteenth century attained a high degree of development. Many persons of wealth and influence fostered this taste and became, through the employment of men skilled in botany and horticulture, generous patrons of science. The world was searched for new and rare plants, which were brought home to Europe for cultivation, and many sumptuous volumes, describing and delineating them, were published, mainly through the...
Page 330 - ... added dwellinghouses for some of the officers, a stable, and other minor buildings. The character, number, and sizes of the buildings generally depend on financial considerations. In placing the structures intended for the visiting public, considerations of convenient access, satisfactory water supply, and the distribution of crowds must be borne in mind, in connection with the landscape design. The planting should follow, as nearly as possible, a natural treatment, except immediately around...
Page 369 - If you say there is no time for such training, then time should be made for it. I have yet to learn of a country school where certain subjects could not well be omitted or postponed in favor of this. To train the eye and hand, to stimulate the power of observation, to awaken an appreciation of the beautiful; in short, to develop all the faculties of the body and mind, is the aim of modern education. What better than horticulture can aid in securing this end? The Other Side.
Page 224 - But in the more limited and usual sense, the term education is confined to the efforts made, of set purpose, to train men in a particular way — the efforts of the grown-up part...
Page 6 - ART. IV. The elective officers of this Society shall constitute an Executive Committee, at any meeting of which a majority of the members shall have power to transact business. The other duties of the officers shall be such as usually pertain to the same officers in similar organizations.

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