The Parliamentary Or Constitutional History of England;: From the Earliest Times, to the Restoration of King Charles II. Collected from the Records, ...

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J. and R. Tonson, and A. Millar, ... and W. Sandby, 1763
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Page 315 - Motion being made, that an humble Addrefs be prefented to his Majefty, that he will be gracioufly pleafed to give Directions, that there be laid...
Page 2 - Or if a Man do levy War against our Lord the King in his Realm, or be adherent to the King's Enemies in his Realm, giving to them Aid and Comfort in the Realm or elsewhere...
Page 367 - Well, since I see all the birds are flown, I do expect from you, that you shall send them unto me as soon as they return hither. But I assure you, on the word of a king, I never did intend any force; but shall proceed against them in a legal and fair way, for I never meant any other.
Page 105 - We are confident, that both the * High and Mighty Lords the States General of the *• United Provinces...
Page 14 - Statutes, and some so penned as they may be taken in divers, yea contrary senses: and therefore would I wish both those Statutes and Reports, as well in the Parliament as Common Law, to be once maturely reviewed and reconciled...
Page 347 - ... by an express warrant in writing under the hand of one of the principal secretaries of state for every such opening, detaining, or delaying...
Page 164 - Being. — I therefore must needs put a very high esteem ' upon,' and have a very reverent opinion of anything that comes from you. And so I have had of this Instrument: — and, I hope, so I have expressed.
Page 183 - ... proper for edification, and the necessary improvement of piety and devotion in the people, though the necessary practice thereof cannot be deduced from scripture ; and that which before was and in itself is indifferent, ceases to be indifferent after it is once established by law ; and therefore our present consideration and work is, to gratify the private consciences of those who are grieved with the use of some ceremonies, by indulging to, and...
Page 96 - The Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, Of the City of London...
Page 308 - ... the house of commons : that to print or publish any books, or libels, reflecting upon the proceedings of the house of commons, or any member thereof, for or relating to his service therein, is a high violation of the rights and privileges of the house of commons.

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