A Practical Introduction to Greek Prose Composition

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D. Appleton & Company, 1850 - Greek language - 237 pages
 

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Page i - NEPOS; With Practical Questions and Answers, and an Imitative Exercise on each Chapter. By THOMAS K. ARNOLD, AM Revised, with Additional Notes, by Prof.
Page 240 - Exercises in Greek Prose Composition. Adapted to the First Book of Xenophon's Anabasis. By JAMES R. BOISE, Prof, of Greek in University of Michigan.
Page ii - Germania and Agricola of Caius Cornelius Tacitus : With Notes for Colleges. By WS TYLER, Professor of the Greek and Latin Languages in Amherst College. 12mo, 193 pages.
Page ii - But it has been his constant, not to say his chief aim, to carry students beyond the dry details of grammar and lexicography, and introduce them into a familiar acquaintance and lively sympathy with the author and his times, and with...
Page 239 - We use iÓ for the present year, in connection with the edition that has been used for several years. Most of the class, however, have procured your edition ; and it is probable that next year it will be used by all.
Page i - What they were learning, and every day becoming more and more disgusted with the dry and unmeaning task; but now, by Mr. Arnold's admirable method — substantially the same with that of Oliendo rff— the moment they take up the study of Latin or Greek, they begin to learn sentences. lo acquire ideas, to see how the Romans and...
Page vii - The object of this Work is to enable the Student, as soon as he can decline and conjugate with tolerable facility, to translate simple sentences after given examples, and with given words; the principles trusted to being principally those of imitation and very frequent repetition. It is at once a Syntax, a Vocabulary, and an Exercise Book.
Page 240 - ... from the fact of its being written with the object to instruct his son, of whom the author had heard unfavorable accounts, and whom the weight of his public duties had prevented him from visiting in person. It presents a great many wise maxims, apt and rich illustrations, and the results of t lie experience and reflections of an acute and powerful mind.
Page ii - OF CAIUS CORNELIUS TACITUS. WITH NOTES FOR COLLEGES. BY WS TYLER, Professor of the Greek and Latin Languages in Amherst College. One very neat volume, 12mo.
Page ii - Notes are appended for the student's use, which contain not only the grammatical, but likewise all the geographical, archaeological, and historical illustrations that are necessary to render the author intelligible. It has been the constant aim of the editor to carry students beyond the dry details of grammar and lexicography, and introduce them to a familiar acquaintance and lively sympathy with the author and his times.

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