World Broadcasting: A Comparative View

Front Cover
Alan Wells
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 323 pages

As mass communication is a major topic of interest in American colleges, there is also a growing interest in comparative mass media in other countries. This book is designed to put current practices in the United States in comparative perspective and thus shed new light on American media practices. It is designed as a resource for the growing number of courses dealing with international media, and a recommended supplement for basic mass communications courses that provide a global perspective.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Western Europe
27
United Kingdom
47
Germany
61
Italy
77
The Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe
91
The Middle East and North Africa
121
SubSaharan Africa
145
Globo TV The Growth of a Brazilian Monopoly
207
Asia
223
Japan
235
China
251
India
267
Oceania and the Pacific
289
Author Index
303
Subject Index
307

Latin America and the Caribbean
185

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Page 5 - In conformity with the interests of the working people, and in order to develop the organizational initiative and political activity of the masses of the people...
Page ii - ... American Engineering Programs 1850-1950 by Teresa C. Kynell, Northern Michigan University, 1996 News Media and Foreign Relations: A Multifaceted Perspective edited by Abbas Malek, Howard University, 1997 World Broadcasting: A Comparative View edited by Alan Wells, Temple University, 1997 Mass Media & Society edited by Alan Wells, Temple University, and Ernest A. Hakanen, Drexel University, 1997 Forthcoming: The Information Revolution: Current & Future Consequences edited by Alan Porter and William...
Page 2 - An editorial in Broadcasting magazine in March, 1955, told of the alleged victory of the American broadcasting plan, which has "prevailed in all democratic nations," over the so-called British Plan. The editorial concluded: "Henceforth the lexicon will change. It will be the American Plan' versus the 'Totalitarian Plan

About the author (1996)

lls /f Alan