Travels of Marco Polo

Front Cover
Penguin, Oct 5, 2004 - History - 336 pages
His journey through the East began in 1271—when, still a teenager, he set out of Venice and found himself traversing the most exotic countries. His acceptance into the court of the great emperor Kublai Khan, and his service to the vast and dazzling Mongol empire, led him to places as far away as Tibet and Burma, lands rich with gems and gold and silk, but virtually unknown to Europeans.

Later, as a prisoner of war, Marco Polo would record the details of his remarkable travels across harsh deserts, great mountain ranges, and dangerous seas, as well as of his encounters with beasts and birds, plants and people. His amazing chronicle is both fascinating and awe-inspiring—and still serves as the most vivid depiction of the mysterious East in the Middle Ages.

Edited and with an Introduction by Milton Rugoff and an Afterword by Howard Mittelmark
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mamzel - LibraryThing

This book gives us the accounts of Marco Polo along with other writers of the time and modern interpretations as well. The pages are styled to resemble an antique medium but unfortunately the font is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JVioland - LibraryThing

Currently, this historical figure is an object of ridicule. He was when he lived. Curiously, there are some inconsistencies in his report, but overall I believe he has told the truth (mostly) of his adventures. A good tale none-the-less and worth the read. Read full review

Contents

Of the Province of Zorzania the Pass Where Alexander the Great
2
Of the Province of Mosul and the People Named Kurds
4
Of the Great City of Baudas Anciently Called Babylon
5
How the Caliph Took Counsel to Slay All Christians
7
How the Christians Were in Great Dismay
8
How the Oneeyed Cobbler Prayed for the Christians
9
How the Prayer of the Cobbler Caused the Mountain to Move
10
Of the Noble City of Tauris
11
Of the Island of Java
94
Of the Islands of Sondur and Kondur
95
Of the Island of Pentan
96
Of the Island of Java Minor
97
Of the Kingdoms Named Samara and Dagroian
99
Of the Kingdoms Named Lambri and Fanfur
101
Of the Island of Nocueran
103
Of the Island of Angaman
104

Of the Monastery of Saint Barsamo
12
Of the Country of Persia
13
What Happened When the Three Magi Returned to Their Own Country
14
Of the Eight Kingdoms of Persia and of the Breed of Horses
15
Of the City of Yasdi
16
Of the Kingdom of Kerman Its Minerals Manufacturers and Falcons
17
Of the City of Kamandu and the District of Reobarle of Certain
18
Of the City of Ormus and the Hot Wind That Blows There
19
Of the Great Desert Country Between Kerman and Kobiam
20
Of Kobiam and Its Manufactures
21
Of the Journey from Kobiam to the Province of Timochain and of
22
Of the Old Man of the Mountain and His Palace and Gardens
23
How the Old Man Trained His Assassins
24
How the Old Man Came by His
25
Of a Fertile Plain of Six Days Journey Succeeded by a Desert of Eight
26
Of the City of Balach
27
Of the Castle Named Thaikan and the Salt Hills of Scassem
28
Of the Province of Balashan the Precious Stones Found There
29
Of the Province of Pascia
30
Of the Province of Kesmur and of Its Inhabitants Who Are Skilled
31
Of the Province of Vokhan of an Ascent for Three Days and
32
Of the City of Kashgar
33
Of the City of Samarkand and the Miraculous Column in the Church
34
Of the Province of Karkan the Inhabitants of Which Are Troubled
35
Of the City of Kotan
36
Of the Province of Peyn the Chalcedony and Jasper Found in
37
Of the Province of Charchan
38
Of the Town of Lop the Vast Desert and the Strange Noises Heard
39
Of the Province of Tangut the City of Sachion and the Ceremony
40
Of the District of Kamul and Some Peculiar Customs Respecting
41
Of the City of Chinchitalas
42
Of the District of Succuir Where Rhubarb Is Produced
43
Of Campichu and of Its Idols and Marriage Customs
44
Of the City of Ezina and a Desert Extending Forty Days Journey
45
Of the City of Karakorum the First in Which the Tartars Had
46
Concerning Genghis First Khan of the Tartars and His
47
Of the Plain of Bargu Its Inhabitants the Ocean and
56
THE GREAT KHAN KUBLAI HIS CAPITAL COURT
66
A JOURNEY TO THE WEST AND SOUTHWEST OF CATHAY
73
A JOURNEY SOUTHWARD THROUGH THE EASTERN
73
OF THE SEA OF CHIN AND THE GREAT ISLAND
84
Of India
85
Of the Island of Zipangu and the Great Khans Attack Against
87
What Came of the Expedition
89
Of the Many Idols Worshiped in Zipangu and of People Addicted
90
Of the Country of Ziamba
92
Of the Island of Zeilan
105
The History of Sagamoni Borcan
106
Of the Province of Maabar
108
More of the Province of Maabar
110
Of the Place Where the Holy Body of St Thomas Lies
115
Of the Kingdom of Mutfili or Monsul
117
Of the Province of
118
Of the City of Kael
120
Of the Kingdom of Koulam
121
Of Komari
123
Of the Kingdom of
124
Of Malabar
125
Of the Kingdom of Guzerat
126
Of the Kingdom of Kanan
127
Concerning the Kingdom of Kambaia
1
Of the Kingdom of Somnath
2
Of the Kingdom of Kesmacoran
3
Of the Islands of Males and of Females
4
Of the Island of Socotra
5
Of the Great Island of Madagascar
7
Of the Island of Zanzibar
9
Of the Great Province Named Abascia or Middle India
11
Of the Province of Aden
13
Of the City of Escier
14
Of the City of Dufar
16
Of the City of Kalayati
17
Of Ormus
18
OF THE REGION OF DARKNESS THE PROVINCE OF RUSSIA GREAT TURKEY
19
Of Great Turkey
20
Of Battles That Were Fought by King Kaidu Against His Uncle
22
What the Great Khan Said of the Injuries Done by His Nephew Kaidu
24
Of the Daughter of King Kaidu and How Strong and Valiant She
25
How Abaga Sent His Son with an Army
27
How Arghun Succeeded His Father in the Sovereignty
28
The Battle Between Acomat and Arghun
29
How Arghun Was Liberated and Slew Acomat
32
How Kiacatu and Then Baidu Seized the Sovereignty
34
Concerning the King of the Tartars Who Rules the Far North
35
Of Those Countries Termed the Region of Darkness
37
Of the Province of Russia and Its People
38
Of the Lords of the Tartars of the West
39
Of the War Between Hulaku and Barka
40
How Totamangu Was Lord of the Tartars of the West
42
CONCLUSION AFTERWORD
45
INDEX
50
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Marco Polo (1254–1324) was the son of a Venetian merchant and traveler. In 1271, Marco, with his father and uncle, began a journey that four years later led to their being accepted at the court of Kublai Khan. During these years, they traveled extensively in Persia and China, through regions almost totally unknown to the Western world. In service to the Khan, Marco explored Tibet and Burma and many of the remote provinces of China; it is possible that he went to the southern parts of India as well. Participating in a military conflict between Genoa and Venice, he was taken prisoner in 1298. While in captivity, he dictated the Travels of Marco Polo to a fellow prisoner.

Milton Rugoff was a longtime editor for several publishing houses. He is the author of a number of books, including A Harvest of World Folk Tales, Marco Polo’s Adventures in China, The Great Travelers, and The Beechers: An American Family in the Nineteenth Century, which was nominated for an American Book Award in 1982.

Howard Mittelmark is an editor, book critic, and coauthor of How Not to Write a Novel. He lives in New York City.

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