A collation of four important manuscripts of the Gospels: with a view to prove their common origin and to restore the text of their archetype

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Hodges, Foster, and Figgis, 1877 - Bible - 389 pages
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This book introduced to the text-critical world the group of Gospels-manuscripts known as family-13.
The importance of family-13 is sometimes overstated; it is quite safe to assume that any reading
unique to family-13 is not original. Nevertheless its text has some interesting readings that express scribal mechanisms that may have been in play in a variety of textual contests. 

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Page ix - The book is now well bound, and on the cover in very recent gold letters we read, " Town Library, Leicester, the gift of Mr Thomas Hayne, 1640," under the Town arms. William Chark was one of the former owners of the celebrated Codex Montfortianus, and is supposed to have lived in the reign of Elizabeth (see Dobbin's Codex Montfortianus, Introduction, p.
Page viii - It is written on vellum and coarse paper mixed together; yet not " temere permixtis," as Wetstein states, but arranged pretty regularly in series of two vellum leaves followed by three paper ones, evidently from previous calculation how far the more costly material would hold out. It is not earlier than the fourteenth century. Mr. Scrivener says :— " At the top of the first page this codex exhibits in a beautiful hand the words Eifii l\epfiov XapKov, then in a later hand
Page ix - Hayne, 1640,' under the town arms. William Chark was one of the former owners of the celebrated Codex Montfortianus, and is supposed to have lived in the reign of Elizabeth ; some of the later changes in the Codex Leicestrensis were made by him, chiefly however in the margin : I suppose he obtained the book from one of the dissolved monasteries. Wetstein, I believe on John Jackson's authority, states that Thomas Hayne, MA, of Trussington, in Leicestershire, gave the volume to the Leicester library...
Page ix - I have adopted the unusual course of presenting tliem to the curious reader (infra, p. xlvi) ; besides these there is no Liturgical matter whatever, no divisions into sections, or Eusebian canons, or notes about Lessons, except a marginal mark or two, as at Mark vii. 6, and a few words, which are often...

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