Barnard's American Journal of Education, Volume 23

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Henry Barnard
F.C. Brownell, 1872 - Education
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Page 103 - ... and some few to be chewed and digested ; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read but not curiously ; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others ; but that would be only in the less important arguments and the meaner sort of books; else distilled books are, like common distilled waters, flashy things.
Page 205 - ... books are not absolutely dead things but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Page 31 - Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him (xxii.
Page 279 - Who, doomed to go in company with Pain, And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train ! Turns his necessity to glorious gain...
Page 250 - If time be of all things the most precious, wasting time must be/ as Poor Richard says, ' the greatest prodigality ; ' since, as he elsewhere tells us, ' Lost time is never found again ; and what we call time enough, always proves little enough.
Page 236 - LAERTES' head. And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportioned thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hooks of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade.
Page 103 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring ; for ornament, is in discourse ; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one ; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best from those that are learned.
Page 286 - To make the weight for the winds ; And he weigheth the waters by measure. When he made a decree for the rain, And a way for the lightning of the thunder : Then did he see it, and declare it ; He prepared it, yea, and searched it out.
Page 236 - But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade. Beware Of entrance to a quarrel ; but, being in, Bear it that the opposer may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Page 254 - Experience keeps a dear School, but Fools will learn in no other, and scarce in that; for it is true, we may give Advice, but we cannot give Conduct...

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