The Life and Correspondence of Thomas Arnold: D. D., Late Head-master of Rugby School, and Regius Professor of Modern History in the University of Oxford, Volume 1

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Appleton, 1845 - 516 pages
 

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Contents

To Rev F C Blackstone Irvingism Gift of tongues Coming of the
36
To the same
42
TO J T Coleridge Esq Choice of a profession
44
To J Ward Esq Domestic Life Intercourse with poor
48
Page
49
To Rev G Cornish Interest in India Pupils Religious state
50
To Rev Augustus Hare Pamphlet Not latitudinarian
69
To W W Hull Esq Health Contession Faith Uncertainty of Life
75
To H Balston Esq a Advice on Composition
81
To Rev Dr Longley Fifth Form Number of the School Schoolgrammar
94
To an old pupil X Value of veneration Calumnies
100
307 310 310
102
To the Rev F C Blackstone Want of leisure Defects in existing books
107
To Mr Justice Coleridge Rugby in the holidays Rugby Magazine
114
and medicine 312 312 313 314 Page
117
GENERAL LIFE AT RUGBY
119
To Chevalier Bunsen Roman History Niebuhr
120
To W W Hull Esq Petition against the Jew Bill Ireland
128
To Mrs Buckland Visit to the Isle of Wight Fox How Winchester
134
To Sir T Pasley Bart Administration of the Sacraments
140
To W C Lake Esq Germany Excess in division of labour Institutes of Gaius Edition of St Pauls Epistles Priesthoud
144
To Rev Dr Hawking Inexs Death of his aunt Church and Priesthood 294
146
To Mr Justice Coleridge English divines Pilgrims Progress
147
To Sir T Pasley Bart Christianity and the Church Succession
148
Claims
149
To Mr Justice Coleridge Fox How in winter Plan of Roman History Study and practice of Law Medicine Oxford
150
To Rev G Cornish Fox How Oxford Corpus 301
151
T Rev J Hearn Consent of antiquity Encharist
152
To W W Hull Esq Grammars
153
To Crabbe Robinson Esq London University Degree in Arts Unita 304
154
To Sir T Pasley Bart Oxford Abboits Way to do Good Duke of Wellingtons Despatches Weather
155
To an old Pupil c Religious duty of cultivating the intellect
156
To Bisbop Oiter London University Charter Different plans
157
To Rev H Hill Thucydides Rome Ordination
158
To C J Vaughan Esq Roman History Professions
159
To Rev J Hearn Parties and individuals
160
To W Empson Esq London University 163 To Rev T Penrose Peace Contrast of parish and school
163
To W Empson Esq London University Degrees in Arts
164
To J C Platt Esq Newspapers Tour in France Security of English aristocracy
165
Legends in Roman History Charter of London University
166
To Rev T J Ormerod The two Antichrists
167
To Mr Justice Coleridge Legends in Roman History
168
To the Rev Dr Hawking London and Oxford Sanderson Fox
169
To Chevalier Buosep Archbishop of Cologne Church and State Rothe 319
171
To an old Pupil D Athanasian creed
181
To T F Ellis Esq Advice for visiting Rome
182
To Rev Dr Hawkins Oxford Examinations Physical Science Froudes
183
tTo Rev w K Hamilion Wordsworths Greek Grammar Skepticism Bunsen
184
To the Earl of Burlington Retiremeni from the London University
185
To Rev J Hearn Rest of parish contrasted with anxiety of school
186
TOJ T Coleridge Esq Family sickness Friendship
188
To J P Gell Esq Appointment to College in Van Diemene Land 345
193
348
199
Fears for the Church Establishment Pamphlet on the Principles of Church
204
T0 J L Hoskyns Esq Reading for ordination
205
To W Smith Esq Unitarians In what sense Christians
211
To the same On the same
224
To Howel Lloyd Esq On the study of Welsh
230
To Chevalier Bunsen Rugby Life Second Volume of Roman History
238
To a person distressed by skeptical doubts
252
To Rev J Tucker Aristotles Politics Prophecy Daniei English
260
To Rev Dr Hawkins Influence of Jews Church and State
286
316
316
332
332
CHAPTER IX
334
Desire for peace and for positive truths Lecture on the divisions of know ledge Two Serraons on Prophecy Second edition of Thucydides Attempt t...
338
To Rev F C Blackstone Professorship
343
To the same
385
To W S Kurr Esq Sanscrit Football matches
391
To an old Pupil G Ordination
398
T0 Rev A P Stanley Modern Greece Tour in Italy Oxford
404
To Mr Justice Coleridge Dissent
410
CHAPTER X
416
To Rev T Will Popery and Protestantism
423
To Rev R Thorpe Oxford School
432
To Chevalier Bunsen Basque language Carthagena
438
APPENDIX
456
Travelling Journals
465
The Mediterranean
475
VI TOUR IN SCOTLAND 1831
482
TOUR TO ROME AND NAPLES THROUGH FRANCE AND ITALY 1840
489
Pantheon S Stephano Rotondo Martyrs
498
Swiss nation
504
Translation of the Bible into French
508
To Rev W K Hunilton Music Flowers Keble
512
ed with a
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Page 102 - When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
Page 134 - So they ran both together ; and the other disciple did outrun Peter, and came first to the sepulchre. And he stooping down, and looking in saw the linen clothes lying ; yet went he not in.
Page 446 - If ye endure chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not ? But if ye be without chastisement, whereof all are partakers, then are ye bastards, and not sons.
Page 460 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin ; but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Page 112 - ... to receive a new fellow from his father — when I think what an influence there is in this place for evil as well as for good. I do not know anything which affects me more.
Page 87 - Years afterwards he used to tell the story to his children, and said, I never felt so much ashamed in my life — that look and that speech I have never forgotten.
Page 153 - I confess, that if I were called upon to name what spirit of evil predominantly deserved the name of Antichrist, I should name the spirit of chivalry — the more detestable for the very guise of the " Archangel ruined," which has made it so seductive to the most generous spirits — but to me so hateful, because it is in direct opposition to the impartial justice of the Gospel, and its comprehensive feeling of equal brotherhood, and because it so fostered a sense of honour rather than a sense of...
Page 83 - will never be what it might be, and what it ought to be." The remonstrances which he encountered both on public and private grounds were vehement and numerous. But on these terms alone had he taken his office...

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