A Progressive Series of Inductive Lessons in Latin: Based on Material Drawn from Classical Sources, Especially from Csar's Commentaries

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Ginn, Heath & Company, 1886 - Latin language - 340 pages
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Page 68 - To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star, On Lemnos the JE'gean isle : thus they relate. Erring...
Page i - Thus confounding two kinds of simplification, teachers have constantly erred by setting out with " first principles " : a proceeding essentially, though not apparently, at variance with the primary rule; which implies that the mind should be introduced to principles through the medium of examples, and so should be led from the particular to the general — from the concrete to the abstract.
Page 70 - It is impossible to describe, or even to imagine, the misery and horror of that scene which followed. Whatever a city taken by storm can dread from military rage, unrestrained by discipline ; whatever excesses the ferocity of the Germans, the avarice of the Spaniards, or the licentiousness of the Italians could commit, these the wretched inhabitants were obliged to suffer.
Page 63 - Spoke to his soul, and every leaf that stirred Found notice from his quickly-glancing eye. There wondrous sleep fell on him : many a year His lids were closed : youth left him, and he woke A careful noter of men's ways ; of clear And lofty spirit : sages, when he spoke, Forgot their systems; and the worldly-wise Shrunk from the gaze of truth with baffled eyes.
Page 75 - Sweet my child, I live for thee.' 24. rudentibus— a puppi, 'braced her with cables both fore and aft.
Page 65 - Therewith he passed within the fair-lying house, and went straight to the hall, to the company of the proud wooers. But upon Argos came the fate of black death even in the hour that he beheld Odysseus again, in the twentieth year.
Page 68 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 79 - Your Holiness wishes to set things right, and you say to me, " Come to Rome. Write a book against Luther. Declare war against his party." Come to Rome? Tell a crab to fly. The crab will say, " Give me wings." I say, " Give me back my youth and strength." I beseech you let the poor sheep speak to his shepherd. What good can I do at Rome? It was said in Germany that I was sent for ; that I was hurrying to you for a share in the spoils. If I write anything at Rome, it will be thought that I am bribed....
Page 70 - Of all birds the Eagle alone has seemed to wise men the type of royalty, a bird neither beautiful nor musical nor good for food, but murderous, greedy, hateful to all, the curse of all, and with its great powers of doing harm only surpassed by its desire to do it.
Page 72 - Back comes the Chief in triumph. Who, in the hour of fight, Hath seen the Great Twin Brethren In harness on his right. Safe comes the ship to haven, Through billows and through gales, If once the Great Twin Brethren Sit shining on the sails.

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