The Iraqi Revolution of 1958: A Revolutionary Quest for Unity and Security

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University Press of America, Dec 18, 2010 - Political Science - 268 pages
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In the early hours of July 14, 1958, Iraqi military officers overthrew the British-installed Iraqi monarchy. The Free Officers coup initiated an era of military and subsequently Ba'thist rule that only ended with the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. Historians are at variance over the nature of what is called the Iraqi Revolution in the Arab world. Some scholars argue that the overthrow was merely a coup d'Ztat orchestrated by the Free Officers Movement. Other analysts contend that the overthrow constituted a real revolution. Very few works, if any, provide a detailed analysis in support of the 'revolutionary' argument. Dr. Romero's book advances the argument that the events of July 14 simultaneously constituted a coup and a revolution for a number of reasons, including military involvement, popular participation, and policies that radically departed from those of the previous regime.
 

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Contents

1 Internal Developments
1
2 Regional Security
19
3 Repression and Exploitation
37
4 Intelligence and Influence
55
5 The Fertile Crescent
71
6 The Free Officers Movement
91
7 A Coup and a Revolution
111
Structure and Reform
131
10 Qasims Foreign Policy
171
11 Arab Unity and Discord
189
Conclusion
209
Figures
219
Tables
221
Bibliography
223
About the Author
241
Copyright

9 International Reactions
151

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About the author (2010)

Juan Romero earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. He taught Middle East history at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. from 2008-2009. He currently teaches Middle East history at Western Kentucky University at Bowling Green.

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