The Education of Karl Witte: Or, The Training of the Child, Volume 1

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Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1914 - Education - 312 pages
 

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Contents

I
v
II
1
III
8
IV
15
V
21
VI
25
VII
63
VIII
69
XIV
158
XV
183
XVI
190
XVII
213
XVIII
223
XIX
235
XX
239
XXI
247

IX
87
X
104
XI
113
XII
123
XIII
135

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Page xxviii - I have no remembrance of the time when I began to learn Greek, I have been told that it was when I was three years old.
Page xxix - I learnt no Latin until my eighth year. At that time I had read, under my father's tuition, a number of Greek prose authors, among whom I remember the whole of Herodotus, and of Xenophon's Cyropaedia and Memorials of Socrates; some of the lives of the philosophers by Diogenes Laertius; part of Lucian, and Isocrates ad Demonicum and Ad Nicoclem.
Page 57 - ... to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading. 16 Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds. 17 And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant : because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities.
Page x - ... but by means of the superior speed and accuracy of the guiding mental processes which reside in the brain.
Page xi - ... the best psychopathologists. What produces nervousness is worry, emotional excitement and lack of interest in the work. But that is precisely what we do with our children. We do not take care to develop a love of knowledge in their early life for fear of brain injury, and then when it is late to...
Page x - Xow, as intellectual dexterity is also a function of orderly functioning of mental processes seated in the brain, it should be manifest that these, too, should reach excellence best when they are trained by a capable hand during 'the formative period of early youth.
Page xxxv - Remember the favorable conditions in which you have lived, surrounded by relatives who loved you and set you a good example; do not forget the close friends who have taken you by the hand and led you away from the quagmires of evil; keep a grateful remembrance for all the teachers who have influenced you, the kind and intelligent schoolmaster, the devoted pastor; realize all these multiple influences which have made of you what you are. Then you will remember that such and such a culprit has not...
Page xx - By the age of nine, in fact, Karl had learned so much, and was so well trained in the use of his mental powers, that his father determined to send him to college. Six months later, accordingly, the boy matriculated at Leipsic University, to begin a scholastic career of marvelous achievement. It is not necessary' here to give details of it. Enough to say that in 1814, before he had passed his fourteenth birthday, he was granted the Ph.D. distinction, and two years later, at the age of sixteen, was...
Page xxix - ... old. My earliest recollection on the subject, is that of committing to memory what my father termed vocables, being lists of common Greek words, with their signification in English, which he wrote out for me on cards. Of grammar, until some years later, I learnt no more than the inflexions of the nouns and verbs, but after a course of vocables, proceeded at once to translation ; and I faintly remember going through żEsop's Fables, the first Greek book which I read.
Page xxix - Fables, the first Greek book which I read. The Anabasis, which I remember better, was the second. I learnt no Latin until my eighth year. At that time I had read, under my father's tuition, a number of Greek prose authors, among whom I remember the whole of Herodotus, and of Xenophon's...

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