The Secret Adversary

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Aug 1, 2010 - Fiction - 458 pages
A must-read for fans of stories from the Golden Age of Detective Fiction, The Secret Adversary is Agatha Christie at her finest. In the midst of spinning an engrossing tale of adventure and international intrigue, Christie uses the novel to introduce the characters Tommy and Tuppence, both of whom figure in many of her books and short stories.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TomDonaghey - LibraryThing

The Secret Adversary (1922) (Tommy & Tuppence #1) by Agatha Christie. The first and the best of the Tommy & Tuppence stories, this book features a truly secret adversary in the form of Mr. Brown ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DrLed - LibraryThing

Synopsis: 'In the Prologue, a man quietly gives important papers to a young American woman, as she is more likely to survive the sinking RMS Lusitania in May 1915. In 1919 London, demobilised soldier ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
6
Chapter I The Young Adventurers Ltd
10
Chapter II Mr Whittingtons Offer
26
Chapter III A Set Back
42
Chapter IV Who is Jane Finn?
54
Chapter V Mr Julius P Hersheimmer
70
Chapter VI A Plan of Campaign
81
Chapter VII The House in Soho
95
Chapter XV Tuppence Receives a Proposal
230
Chapter XVI Further Adventures of Tommy
244
Chapter XVII Annette
261
Chapter XVIII The Telegram
288
Chapter XIX Jane Finn
313
Chapter XX Too Late
332
Chapter XXI Tommy Makes a Discovery
344
Chapter XXII In Downing Street
355

Chapter VIII The Adventures of Tommy
105
Chapter IX Tuppence Enters Domestic Service
122
Chapter X Enter Sir James Peel Edgerton
139
Chapter XI Julius Tells a Story
152
Chapter XII A Friend in Need
168
Chapter XIII The Vigil
198
Chapter XIV A Consultation
217
Chapter XXIII A Race Against Time
366
Chapter XXIV Julius Takes a Hand
378
Chapter XXV Janes Story
399
Chapter XXVI Mr Brown
422
Chapter XXVII A Supper Party at the Savoy
432
Chapter XXVIII And After
449
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About the author (2010)

One of the most successful and beloved writer of mystery stories, Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie was born in 1890 in Torquay, County Devon, England. She wrote her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in 1920, launching a literary career that spanned decades. In her lifetime, she authored 79 crime novels and a short story collection, 19 plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language with another billion in 44 foreign languages. Some of her most famous titles include Murder on the Orient Express, Mystery of the Blue Train, And Then There Were None, 13 at Dinner and The Sittaford Mystery. Noted for clever and surprising twists of plot, many of Christie's mysteries feature two unconventional fictional detectives named Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple. Poirot, in particular, plays the hero of many of her works, including the classic, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), and Curtain (1975), one of her last works in which the famed detective dies. Over the years, her travels took her to the Middle East where she met noted English archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan. They married in 1930. Christie accompanied Mallowan on annual expeditions to Iraq and Syria, which served as material for Murder in Mesopotamia (1930), Death on the Nile (1937), and Appointment with Death (1938). Christie's credits also include the plays, The Mousetrap and Witness for the Prosecution (1953; film 1957). Christie received the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for 1954-1955 for Witness. She was also named Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1971. Christie died in 1976.

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