Keeping Time: The History and Theory of Preservation in America

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Sep 5, 2005 - Architecture - 272 pages
The historic preservation movement has had a huge influence on America's built landscape for the past thirty years. Discover the cornerstone primer on the topic -- Keeping Time. This edition features a wealth of new material, including new chapters on preservation values in oral-based cultures, international preservation, and future developments in the field.

In addition, you?ll find a clear, concise survey of preservation movement?s history, complete with:

  • Helpful coverage of the theory and practice driving the movement.
  • Expanded material on landscape preservation.
  • New information on scientific conservation, cultural corridors, and historic tourism.
  • Numerous informative photographs illustrating the book's content.

Order your copy of this fundamental volume for tomorrow's historic preservationists today.

 

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User Review  - TLCrawford - LibraryThing

“Keeping time: the history and theory of preservation in America” is a book that I had my eye on for years. When I finally found a copy i was still interested enough to put it at that head of my ‘to ... Read full review

Keeping Time: The History and Theory of Preservation in America

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This one-volume introduction to the history and philosophy of preservation in America moves from the private sector's early concern for saving patriotic sites to extensive governmental activity and ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
2
viii
6
CHAPTER 3
22
Government and the Preservation Movement
37
CHAPTER 6
63
CHAPTER 8
87
10
107
CHAPTER 11
119
CHAPTER 13
139
CHAPTER 14
147
Preservation in Practice
155
APPENDIX
171
APPENDIX
181
Glossary
207
Bibliography
215
Illustration Credits
233

CHAPTER 12
127

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About the author (2005)

WILLIAM J. MURTAGH has held pivotal positions in the field of historic preservation for almost fifty years. He served as the first keeper of the National Register of Historic Places, Department of the Interior; and was vice president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and president of the Victorian Society in America. He directed the preservation program at Columbia University and initiated preservation programs at the University of Maryland and the University of Hawaii. He is a founding and active member of the Preservation Roundtable in Washington, D.C.

Bibliographic information