The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Linguistics

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Shigeru Miyagawa, 衛斎藤
Oxford University Press, USA, Nov 3, 2008 - Foreign Language Study - 553 pages
Over the past twenty years or so, the work on Japanese within generative grammar has shifted from primarily using contemporary theory to describe Japanese to contributing directly to general theory, on top of producing extensive analyses of the language. The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Linguistics captures the excitement that comes from answering the question, "What can Japanese say about Universal Grammar?" Each of the eighteen chapters takes up a topic in syntax, morphology, acquisition, processing, phonology, or information structure, and, first of all, lays out the core data, followed by critical discussion of the various approaches found in the literature. Each chapter ends with a section on how the study of the particular phenomenon in Japanese contributes to our knowledge of general linguistic theory. This book will be useful to students and scholars of linguistics who are interested in the latest studies on one of the most extensively studied languages within generative grammar.
 

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Id just like to say that this book is very thick and the flat picture does it no justice. This book is a surprising find on this site but its content is a bit specific and Im not a fan of how it seems ... Read full review

Contents

1 Introduction
3
2 On the Causative Construction
20
3 Japanese Wa Ga and Information Structure
54
4 Lexical Classes in Phonology
84
5 On Verb Raising
107
6 Nominative Object
141
7 Japanese Accent
165
8 GaNo Conversion
192
12 VV Compounds
320
13 WhQuestions
348
14 Indeterminate Pronouns
372
15 Noun Phrase Ellipsis
394
16 Ditransitive Constructions
423
17 Prominence Marking in the Japanese Intonation System
456
18 The Structure of DP
513
Author Index
541

9 Processing Sentences in Japanese
217
10 The Acquisition of Japanese Syntax
250
11 The Syntax and Semantics of Floating Numeral Quantifiers
287

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About the author (2008)


Shigeru Miyagawa is Professor of Linguistics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mamoru Saito is Professor of Linguistics, Nanzan University, Nagoya Japan

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