Goodbye to the Vikings?: Re-Reading Early Medieval Archaeology

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Bloomsbury Academic, Mar 9, 2006 - History - 208 pages
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"In Goodbye to the Vikings?", Richard Hodges uses new archaeological evidence to re-read the familiar history of the early Middle Ages. Taking his examples from the fifth to the tenth centuries, he re-examines many familiar themes, including the identity of King Arthur, the Pirenne thesis, Marc Bloch on feudalism, the significance of nationalism in early medieval archaeology and the place of the Vikings in European history. Some of the studies are wide-ranging, while others re-examine the archaeology of the monastery of San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy) in detail. This book shows how archaeology is making us appreciate the changing rhythms of early medieval Europe, especially in terms of the contacts made by traders, pilgrims and travellers.

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Contents

Pirenne and the question of demand in the sixth century
19
Balkan Ghosts? Nationalism and the question of rural
39
Dark Age Economics revisited
63
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Richard Hodges, formerly Director of the British School at Rome, is Director of the Institute of World Archaeology, School of World Art Studies, University of East Anglia, and Scientific Director of the Butrint Foundation (Butrint is the site of extensive excavations in Albania). He is series editor of the Duckworth Debates in Archaeology series and author of many books, including Dark Age Economics, The Anglo-Saxon Achievement and Villa to Village.

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