The Poems of Elizabeth Barrett Browning

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E. Moxon, 1844 - 551 pages
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Page 131 - And, underneath our heavy eyelids drooping, The reddest flower would look as pale as snow. For all day we drag our burden tiring Through the coal-dark, underground; Or all day we drive the wheels of iron In the factories, round and round.
Page 255 - And the steed shall be red-roan, And the lover shall be noble, With an eye that takes the breath. And the lute he plays upon Shall strike ladies into trouble, As his sword strikes men to death.
Page 255 - She has thrown her bonnet by, And her feet she has been dipping In the shallow water's flow : Now she holds them nakedly In her hands, all sleek and dripping, While she rocketh to and fro. Little Ellie sits alone, And the smile she softly useth Fills the silence like a speech, While she thinks what shall be done, And the sweetest pleasure chooseth For her future, within reach.
Page 132 - Ay, be silent ! Let them hear each other breathing For a moment, mouth to mouth — Let them touch each other's hands, in a fresh wreathing Of their tender human youth ! Let them feel that this cold metallic motion Is not all the life God fashions or reveals — Let them prove their...
Page 254 - Mid the beeches of a meadow By a stream-side on the grass, And the trees are showering down Doubles of their leaves in shadow On her shining hair and face. She has thrown her bonnet by, And her feet she has been dipping In the shallow water's flow : Now she holds them nakedly In her hands, all sleek and dripping, While she rocketh to and fro. Little Ellie sits alone, And the smile she softly uses Fills the silence like a speech While she thinks what shall be done.
Page 135 - how long, O cruel nation, Will you stand, to move the world, on a child's heart? Stifle down with a mailed heel its palpitation. And tread onward to your throne amid the mart !
Page 133 - ... stirred? When we sob aloud, the human creatures near us Pass by, hearing not, or answer not a word. And we hear not (for the wheels in their resounding) Strangers speaking at the door; Is it likely God, with angels singing round him, Hears our weeping any more ? "Two words, indeed, of praying we remember. And at midnight's hour of harm, 'Our Father,' looking upward in the chamber, We say softly for a charm. We know no other words except 'Our Father...
Page 134 - And well may the children weep before you! They are weary ere they run: They have never seen the sunshine, nor the glory Which is brighter than the sun. They know the grief of man without...
Page 132 - Now, tell the poor young children, O my brothers, To look up to Him and pray — So the blessed One, who blesseth all the others, Will bless them another day. They answer, " Who is God that He should hear us...
Page 271 - And that dismal cry rose slowly And sank slowly through the air, Full of spirit's melancholy And eternity's despair ! And they heard the words it said — PAN is DEAD — GREAT PAN is DEAD — PAN, PAN is DEAD.

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