The Black Tulip

Front Cover
BiblioBazaar, Mar 14, 2007 - Fiction - 260 pages
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

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User Review  - jonfaith - LibraryThing

Consider me befuddled. William of Orange is depicted in The Black Tulip as an almost pantomime villain, although bereft of curling moustaches. Whereas Neal Stephenson characterizes Willie as a ... Read full review

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User Review  - mrsdanaalbasha - LibraryThing

The Black Tulip is a historical novel written by Alexandre Dumas, père. The story begins with a historical event — the 1672 lynching of the Dutch Grand Pensionary (roughly equivalent to a modern ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

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