Interpreting the Musical Past: Early Music in Nineteenth-Century France

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Oxford University Press, Sep 22, 2005 - Music - 320 pages
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This study of the French early music revival gives us a vivid sense of how music's cultural meanings were contested in the nineteenth century. It surveys the main patterns of revivalist activity while also providing in-depth studies of repertories stretching from Adam de la Halle to Rameau.
 

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Contents

Uses Appropriations Meanings
117
Conclusion
241
Personalia
257
Bibliography
263
Index
285
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About the author (2005)

Katharine Ellis is Reader in Music at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her work centers on the cultural history of music in nineteenth-century France. She has published on "directors' opera" in the 1830s, Wagnerism, music criticism, women as performers, and music education. Current projects include a volume of Berlioziana edited with David Charlton, and a monograph on music in the French regions. A former joint editor of Music & Letters, Ellis is editor of the Journal of the Royal Musical Association.

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