The Little Bookroom: Eleanor Farjeon's Short Stories for Children Chosen by Herself

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New York Review of Books, 1955 - Juvenile Fiction - 314 pages
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In The Little Bookroom, Eleanor Farjeon mischievously tilts our workaday world to reveal its wonders and follies. Her selection of her favorite stories describes powerful—and sometimes exceedingly silly—monarchs, and commoners who are every bit their match; musicians and dancers who live for aft rather than earthly reward; and a goldfish who wishes to "marry the Moon, surpass the Sun, and possess the World."
 

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Contents

THE KING AND THE CORN
1
THE KINGS DAUGHTER CRIES FOR THE MOON
7
YOUNG KATE
32
THE FLOWER WITHOUT A NAME
36
THE GOLDFISH
40
THE CLUMBER PUP
47
THE MIRACLE OF THE POOR ISLAND
74
THE GIRL WHO KISSED THE PEACHTREE
83
LEAVING PARADISE
149
THE LITTLE LADYS ROSES
174
IN THOSE DAYS
179
THE CONNEMARA DONKEY
184
THE TIMS
204
PENNYWORTH
208
AND I DANCE MINE OWN CHILD
216
THE LOVEBIRDS
244

WESTWOODS
91
THE BARRELORGAN
116
THE GIANT AND THE MITE
120
THE LITTLE DRESSMAKER
125
THE LADYS ROOM
138
THE SEVENTH PRINCESS
142
SAN FAIRY ANN
248
THE GLASS PEACOCK
263
THE KIND FARMER
272
OLD SURLY AND THE BOY
289
PANNYCHIS
293
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About the author (1955)

Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965) grew up in England in a house filled with books, and she and her brothers enjoyed reading stories to one another and writing their own. In America, Farjeon's best-known work may be the hymn "Morning Has Broken," later recorded by Cat Stevens, but in her native country she is beloved as the author of Elsie Piddock Skips in her Sleep, Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard, and, of course, The Little Bookroom. Farjeon was pleased when The Little Bookroom won the prestigious Hans Christian Andersen Award and the Carnegie Medal, but she turned down another honor--Dame of the British Empire--explaining that she "did not wish to become different from the milkman." At her death, the Children's Book Circle established the Eleanor Farjeon Award in her honor.

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