Napoleon Bonaparte: A Life

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Harper Collins, Aug 26, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 944 pages
5 Reviews

A definitive biography of Bonaparte from his birth in Corsica to his death in exile on St Helena, this book examines all aspects of Bonaparte‘s spectacular rise to power and his dizzying fall. It offers close examination of battlefield victories, personal torments, military genius, Bonaparte‘s titanic ego and his relationships with the French government, Talleyrand, Wellington and Josephine. A consummate biography of a complex man.

 

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NAPOLEON BONAPARTE

User Review  - Kirkus

A biography so negative, it even casts doubt on Napoleon's military genius. Historian Schom (Trafalgar, 1990, etc.) breaks no new ground in portraying the man who rose from the impoverished Corsican ... Read full review

Napoleon Bonaparte

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Until now, there has been no comprehensive, one-volume biography on Napoleon. This book ably fills that gap. Napoleonic scholar Schom (One Hundred Days, Atheneum, 1992) has written an objective ... Read full review

Contents

The Marches of Empire
415
Point of No Return
434
Iberia
453
Another Grave Error
473
Another Danube Campaign
488
Wagram
518
The Last Rose of Summer
540
Cbimes and Alarm Bells
561

In the Shadow of Defeat
145
Tivoli and Beyond
160
Road to Damascus
173
Prelude to a Coup
189
I8I9 Brumaire
203
The Consulate
222
The Foreign Minister
240
Fouches Police
251
Fouche the Man
264
The Christmas Eve Plot and Others
273
The Revolution Is Over
289
War Once Again
308
The Coronation
333
A Humiliating Business
353
Intermezzo a la Bonaparte
371
It All Began with Austerlitz
389
Russia
583
Malets Malaise
617
Death March
628
The Saxon Campaign
645
Leipzig
668
The Cossacks Are Coming
683
Projects of Troubles and Upsettings
709
To Conquer or Perish
735
Final Casualties
767
EPILOGUE
789
Napoleons Marshals
791
Medical Notes
793
NOTES
795
BIBLIOGRAPHY
847
INDEX
867
Copyright

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Page xi - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Page 328 - Should the implacable enemy so far succeed as to land, you will have an opportunity of showing your zeal at the head of your regiment. It will be the duty of every man to stand forward on such an occasion ; and I shall certainly think it mine to set an example in defence of every thing that is dear to me and to my people.
Page 107 - Lordship will be, with the hazardous nature of the measure which we now have in contemplation ; but I cannot at the same time help feeling how much depends upon its success, and how absolutely necessary it is at this time to run some risk, in order, if possible, to bring about a new system of affairs in Europe, which shall save us all from being overrun by the exorbitant power of France.
Page 756 - ... panes of glass. The artillery did great execution, but our musketry did not at first seem to kill many men ; though it brought down a large number of horses, and created indescribable confusion. The horses of the first rank of cuirassiers, in spite of all the efforts of their riders, came to a stand-still, shaking and covered with foam, at about twenty yards' distance from our squares, and generally resisted all attempts to force them to charge the line of serried steel.
Page 228 - ... In whatever circumstances you may be placed by fortune, you know well, my friend, that you cannot have a better or a dearer friend than myself, or one who wishes more sincerely for your happiness. Life is a flimsy dream, soon to be over. If you are going away, and you think that it may be for some time, send me your portrait ; we have lived together for so many years, BO closely united, that our hearts have become one, and you know JoiT, 179& ENGLISH MOVEMENTS.
Page 348 - I swear to maintain the integrity of the territory of the Republic, to respect and cause to be respected the laws of the concordat and the liberty of...

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About the author (1998)

Alan Schom is a Fellow at the Hoover Institution and has lectured on French History at Oxford University. He lives in California and France.

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