Witch Winnie, the Story of a "king's Daughter;"

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O. Anderson & Ferrier, 1890 - 358 pages
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Page 302 - I HAVE been here before, But when or how I cannot tell : I know the grass beyond the door, The sweet keen smell, The sighing sound, the lights around the shore. You have been mine before, — How long ago I may not know : But just when at that swallow's soar Your neck turned so, Some veil did fall, — I knew it all of yore.
Page 291 - E'er wore his crown as loftily as he Wears the green coronal of leaves with which Thy hand has graced him. Nestled at his root Is beauty, such as blooms not in the glare Of the broad sun. That delicate forest flower With scented breath, and look so like a smile...
Page 281 - In their bloom, And the names he loved to hear Have been carved for many a year On the tomb.
Page 162 - The human sorrow and smart ! And yet it never was in my soul To play so ill a part : But evil is wrought by want of Thought, As well as want of Heart...
Page 84 - Could show but dead-brown sticks and straws ; the walls Were green, the carpet was pure green, the straight Small bed was curtained greenly, and the folds Hung green about the window which let in The out-door world with all its greenery. You could not push your head out and escape...
Page 260 - Gladness of woods, skies, waters, all in one, The bobolink has come, and, like the soul Of the sweet season vocal in a bird, Gurgles in ecstasy we know not what Save "June ! Dear June ! Now God be praised for June.
Page 331 - And he said unto them, Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place, and rest a while : for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat.
Page 293 - ... there is hardly a roadside pond or pool which has not as much landscape in it as above it. It is not the brown, muddy, dull thing we suppose it to be; it has a heart like ourselves, and in the bottom of that there are the boughs of the tall trees, and the blades of the shaking grass, and all manner of hues, of variable, pleasant light out of the sky...

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