Memoires of the reign of George III. to the commencement of the year 1799

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Printed and sold by Marchbank, 1802 - Great Britain
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Page 166 - Wherefore, that here we may briefly end: of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world: all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power: both angels and men, and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 153 - There is a rank due to the United States among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it ; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known that we are at all times ready for war.
Page 140 - ... into remote and problematical guilt, with a new power of enforcing them by chains and dungeons to every person whose face a minister thinks fit to dislike...
Page 11 - Jlrikes at the fecurity and peace of all independent nations, and is purfued in open defiance of every principle of moderation, good faith, humanity, and. juftice. In a caufe of fuch general concern, His Majefty has every reafon to hope for the cordial co-operation of thofe powers who are united with His Majejly by the ties of alliance, or who feel an intereft in preventing the extenjion of anarchy and confufien, and in contributing to the fecurity and tranquillity of Europe.
Page 241 - Should this crisis terminate in any order of things compatible with the tranquillity of other countries, and affording a reasonable expectation of security and permanence in any treaty which might be concluded, the appearance of a disposition to negotiate for general peace on just and suitable terms will not fail to be met, on my part, with an earnest desire to give it the fullest and speediest effect.
Page 27 - High Mightinesses, whether it would not be proper to employ all the means in your power, to prohibit from entering your...
Page 426 - Batavian republic, articles by which the three powers refpe&ively guarantee the territories poffefled by each of them before the war. The French government, unable to detach itfelf from the engagements which it has contracted by thefe treaties...
Page 37 - Your Petitioners complain, that the right of voting is regulated by no uniform or rational principle. Your Petitioners complain, that the exercise of the elective franchise is only renewed once in seven years.
Page 153 - The United States ought not to indulge a persuasion, that, contrary to the order of human events, they will for ever keep at a distance those painful appeals to arms, with which the history of every other nation abounds. There is a .rank due to the United States among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness.
Page 9 - Europe from the progress of the French arms. With respect to Holland, the conduct of ministers afforded a fresh proof of their disingenuousness. They could not state that the Dutch had called upon us to fulfil the terms of our alliance. They were obliged to confess, that no such requisition had been made; but added, that they knew the Dutch were very much disposed to make it. Whatever might be the words of the treaty, we were bound in honour, by virtue of that treaty, to protect the Dutch, if they...

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