A Popular History of England: From the Earliest Times to the Accession of Victoria, Volume 5

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D. Estes and C. E. Lauriat, 1881 - Great Britain
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Page 362 - ... the banner which we now carry in this fight, though perhaps at some moment it may droop over our sinking heads, yet it soon again will float in the eye of Heaven, and it will be borne by the firm hands of the united people of the three kingdoms, perhaps not to an easy, but to a certain and to a not far distant victory.
Page 132 - England; and whether, as the Roman in days of old, held himself free from indignity when he could say "Civis Romanus sum" (I am a Roman citizen), so also a British subject, in whatever land he may be, shall feel confident that the watchful eye and the strong arm of England will protect him against injustice and wrong.
Page 334 - Alabama claims. And whereas Her Britannic Majesty has authorized her High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries to express in a friendly spirit the regret felt by Her Majesty's Government for the escape, under whatever circumstances, of the Alabama and other vessels from British ports, and for the depredations committed by those vessels.
Page 334 - First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruis* or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
Page 334 - Queen, and the others respectively by the President of the United States, the King of Italy, the President of the Swiss Confederation, and the Emperor of Brazil.
Page 136 - Your beloved country has received a place among the fair churches which, normally constituted, form the splendid aggregate of Catholic communion ; Catholic England has been restored to its orbit in the ecclesiastical firmament from which its light had long vanished, and begins now anew its course of regularly adjusted action round the centre of unity, the source of jurisdiction, of light, and of vigour.
Page 365 - Your attention will again be called to the state of the representation of the people in Parliament ; and I trust that your deliberations, conducted in a spirit of moderation and mutual forbearance, may lead to the adoption of measures which, without unduly disturbing the balance of political power, shall freely extend the elective franchise.
Page 28 - In the discussion which followed in the House of Commons, Sir Robert Peel observed that her Majesty had 'the singular good fortune to be able to gratify her private feelings, while she performs her public duty, and to obtain the best guarantee for happiness by contracting an alliance founded on affection.
Page 238 - In the House of Lords, lord Kingston moved for the appointment of a committee to inquire into the state of the Protestant church in the province of Munster.
Page 238 - an insolent barbarian, wielding authority at Canton, violated the British flag, broke the engagements of treaties, offered rewards for the heads of British subjects in that part of China, and planned their destruction by murder, assassination, and poison.

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