Among the Dolls

Front Cover
Knopf, 1991 - Juvenile Fiction - 70 pages
6 Reviews
A dark awakening . . .When her parents give her a gloomy old dollhouse for her birthday instead of the ten speed bike she's expecting, Vicky is disappointed. But she soon becomes fascinated by the small shadowy world and its inhabitants. The hours she spends playing with the dolls is a good way to escape from her parents's arguments. As Vicky's life becomes more troubled, she starts to take out her frustration on the dolls, making their lives as unhappy as hers. Then one day, Vicky wakes up inside the dollhouse, trapped among the monsters she's created. Bewildered, Vicky is sure she's dreaming. Can she find her way out of this nightmare world?

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
2
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BrynDahlquis - LibraryThing

Another not-so-great Sleator (though it's not as disappointing as Into The Dream). The premise is great, the idea is creepy, and the ending is okay. Just none of it was well executed. I feel like it ... Read full review

AMONG THE DOLLS

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

The antique dollhouse Vicky's parents buy for her tenth birthday—instead of the hoped-for ten-speed bike—distresses her even more when she finds herself inside it, the prisoner and intended slave of ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
10
Section 2
14
Section 3
21
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1991)

William Sleator was born on February 13, 1945 in Harve de Grace, Maryland. In 1967, he received a BA in English from Harvard University. He mainly wrote science fiction novels for young adults. His first novel, Blackbriar, was published in 1972. He wrote more than 30 books including House of Stairs, Interstellar Pig, The Green Futures of Tycho, Strange Attractors, The Spirit House, The Boy Who Couldn't Die, and The Phantom Limb. His picture book, The Angry Moon, won a Caldecott Award in 1971. He died on August 3, 2011 at the age of 66.

Trina Schart Hyman was born on April 8, 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She studied at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art, the Boston Museum School of Art, and Konstfackskolan, the Swedish State Art School. While living in Sweden, she got her first illustration job with Brown and Little. Her first work, Toffe and the Little Car, was published in 1961. During her lifetime, she illustrate over 150 children's books. She received numerous awards including a Horn Award for King Stork in 1973, the Caldecott Medal for Margaret Hodges's St. George and the Dragon: A Golden Legend Adapted from Edmund Spenser's 'Faerie Queen', and Caldecott honors three times for Little Red Riding Hood, A Child's Calendar, and Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins. She also wrote and illustrated her own books including How Six Found Christmas, A Little Alphabet, Little Red Riding Hood, and Self-Portrait: Trina Schart Hyman. She joined the staff of Cricket magazine for children as an artist and illustrator in 1972 and became its art director before leaving in 1979. She died from complications of breast cancer on November 19, 2004 at the age of 65.

Bibliographic information