A Dictionary of Men's Wear ... with an Appendix Containing Sundry Useful Tables: The Uniforms of "ancient and Honorable" Independent Military Companies of the U. S.; Charts of Correct Dress, Livery, and So Forth

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W. H. Baker, 1908 - Clothing - 326 pages
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Page 315 - Peers be of crimson velvet, edged with miniver, the cape furred with miniver pure, and powdered with bars or rows of ermine, according to their degree, viz. Barons, two rows. Viscounts, two rows and a half. Earls, three rows. Marquesses, three rows and a half. Dukes, four rows. The said mantles or robes to be worn over the full Court dress, uniform, or regimentals usually worn at Her Majesty's Drawing- Rooms.
Page 315 - The coronet of a Viscount to have, on the circle, sixteen silver balls. The coronet of an Earl to have, on the circle, eight silver balls, raised upon points, with gold strawberry leaves between the points. The coronet of a...
Page 315 - Their coronets to be of silver-gilt, the caps of crimson velvet turned up with ermine, with a gold tassel on the top, and no jewels or precious stones are to be set or used in the coronets, or counterfeit pearls instead of silver balls. " The coronet of a Baron to have on the circle or rim six silver balls at equal distances. " The coronet of a Viscount to have on the circle sixteen silver balls. " The coronet of an Earl to have on the circle eight silver balls raised upon points, with gold strawberry...
Page 315 - The coronet of a Baron to have, on the circle or rim, six silver balls at equal distances. The coronet of a Viscount to have, on the circle, sixteen silver balls. The coronet of an Earl to have, on the circle, eight silver balls, raised upon points, with gold strawberry leaves between the points.
Page 152 - ... a backing of some reflecting substance; as, quicksilver, tinfoil, black paint, etc. Lookout. — A seaman or other person keeping watch on the forecastle head or in the crow's nest of a vessel, to look out for lights, approaching vessels, or dangers of the sea. Loom. — 1. A machine in which yarn or thread is woven into a fabric by the crossing of threads, called chain or warp running lengthwise, with others called weft, woof or filling.
Page 98 - Felt, n. 1. Properly, a fabric made by interlocking or compacting wool, fur or hair, or a mixture thereof, by rolling or pressure, without weaving, often with the aid of glue and heat; also a woven fabric whose fibers are matted by shrinking or otherwise. 2. A piece of material so made; also, some article manufactured therefrom, as a hat.
Page 206 - ... shield, carried by a foot-soldier, and having an aperture for sight, and another at the side through which to thrust the point of the sword; it was about three feet in diameter.
Page 111 - Stale, or upon the president, sovereign, or member of the royal family of other countries; and at ceremonies and entertainments when it is desirable to do special honor to the occasion.
Page 83 - Full-dress and Dress Breeches for General Officers and all Officers of the Staff Corps and Departments. — Of dark-blue material, cut in the prescribed pattern and fastened from the knee down with dark bone buttons of appropriate size or with laces. These will be worn with the full-dress and dress uniform mounted. Black boots and spurs will invariably be worn with these uniforms. For full-dress and dress breeches of officers of cavalry, artillery, and infantry, when mounted, breeches cut and fastened...
Page 16 - ... with a rolling collar of black velvet 3 inches broad, and closing at the throat with a long loop. It may be worn by all officers when not on duty with troops under arms.

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