"Ye Will Say I Am No Christian": The Thomas Jefferson/John Adams Correspondence on Religion, Morals, and Values

Front Cover
Prometheus Books, 2006 - History - 258 pages
5 Reviews
The "Culture Wars" have produced a lot of talk about religion, morals, and values, with both sides often hearkening back to our Founding Fathers. Here is your chance to learn firsthand what two of the most influential pillars of the American Republic thought about these perennial topics. From 1812 to July 4, 1826 — when ironically death claimed both men — Thomas Jefferson and John Adams exchanged letters touching on these still controversial issues.
These little-known letters contain many surprising revelations. In the 1800 presidential election, in which the Republican Jefferson opposed the Federalist Adams, religion was a topic of hot debate, as reflected in this correspondence written many years after. What was it about Jefferson’s religious beliefs that provoked such vitriol against him in the campaign? And what was there in Adams’s theology that prompted certain Calvinists and Trinitarians to label him "no Christian"? Though they expressed different opinions, Jefferson and Adams agreed on what they called the "corruptions of Christianity." Despite their criticisms and their critics, both men considered themselves Christians, in different senses of the term.
Hearing these champions of liberty and freedom of religion speak out frankly on church and state, the Bible, Jesus, Christianity, morality, and virtue, modern readers may well ask themselves whether either of these Founding Fathers could today be elected president. Editor Bruce Braden has done us all a service by collecting this revealing and intimate historical correspondence on topics that continue to stir emotions and debate in the 21st century.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
3
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

Correspondence between Adams and Jefferson in their declining years shows that their minds remained as sharp as ever, and that they remained politically and socially engaged until the very end. The ... Read full review

Review: Ye Will Say I Am No Christian: The Thomas Jefferson/John Adams Correspondence on Religion, Morals, And Values

User Review  - John Martindale - Goodreads

What a pleasure to get to read Jefferson's and Adams correspondence on the subjects of religion, morals and values. So far, I find I like Adams the most, i think its because Adam's writing style is so easy to follow. Read full review

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
15
Thomas Jefferson to John Adams May 27 1813 48
27
UnitariansLindsey s memoirs
51
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Bruce Braden, with an undergraduate degree in sociology and an MA in personality theory and religion, is an independent scholar and the author of two books of poetry.

Bibliographic information