The Story of Genesis and Exodus: An Early English Song, about A.D. 1250

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Richard Morris
Early English Text Society, 1865 - Bible - 224 pages
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Page xxxvii - I have only to add, that the metre of the Christabel is not, properly speaking, irregular, though it may seem so from its being founded on a new principle: namely, that of counting in each line the accents, not the syllables. Though the latter may vary from seven to twelve, yet in each line the accents will be found to be only four.
Page xxxviii - A poet's business is, in fact, to take care that the syllables which are to be rapidly pronounced are such as easily can be so ; and that the syllables which are to be heavily accented are naturally those that ought to be. If he gives attention to this it does not much matter whether each foot has two or three syllables in it.
Page vii - First in time and first in importance is the Story of Genesis and Exodus, recently edited for the Early English Text Society. " It seems to have been the object of the author to present to his readers, in as few words as possible, the most important facts in the Books of Genesis and Exodus, without any elaboration or comment, and he has, therefore, omitted such facts as were not essentially necessary to the completeness of his narrative...
Page xxviii - ... many, siodu, custom. 132. Weak Verbs (see 49, 50). There are three classes of weak verbs in Old English. In verbs of Class I the infinitive ends in -an (but -ian when the stem of the verb ends in single r preceded by a short vowel or short diphthong); the preterit indicative first person singular ends in -ede, -de, or -te; the past participle ends in -ed, -d, or -t. Most weak verbs are derived from nouns, from adjectives, or from strong verbs. The relation of weak verbs to the nouns, adjectives,...
Page viii - ... important facts in the Books of Genesis and Exodus, without any elaboration or comment, and he has, therefore, omitted such facts as were not essentially necessary to the completeness of his narrative: while, on the other hand, he has included certain portions of the Books of Numbers and Deuteronomy, so as to present to his readers a complete history of the wanderings of the Israelites, and the life of Moses their leader.
Page vi - Our author .... introduces his subject to his readers by telling them that they ought to love a rhyming story which teaches the layman (though he be learned in no books) how to love and serve God, and live peaceably and amicably with his fellow-Christians. His poem or
Page xxxvii - The essence of the system of versification which the poet has adopted is, briefly, that every line shall have four accented syllables in it ; the unaccented syllables being left in some measure, as it were, to take care of themselves.
Page 45 - Thy dwelling shall be of the fatness of the earth and of the dew of heaven from above.
Page viii - The story of the death of Cain by the hand of Lamech may well be inserted here. It is scarcely necessary to say that the incident referred to is given with remarkable brevity in the Bible. In Gen. iv. 23, 24, the Authorized Version is, "Hear my voice, ye wives of Lamech, hearken...
Page 139 - The first dai sal al the se Boln and ris and heyer be Than ani fel of al the land, And als a felle up sal it stand, The heyt thar-of sal passe the felles Bi sexti fot, als Jerom telles, (2) And als mikel the tother day Sal it sattel and wit away, And be lauer than it nou esse, For water sal it haf wel lesse.

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