The War of the Worlds

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Fiction - 304 pages
Causing mass hysteria as listeners of its 1938 radio broadcast believed a Martian invasion of Earth really was taking place, H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds is perhaps the most famous novel of its genre. This 1898 story has spawned films, radio and television series and comic-book adaptions, and its popularity endures today.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
31
4 stars
63
3 stars
28
2 stars
6
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

Better than his Invisible Man, but not as good as his Time Machine (which still rates as one of my top Sci Fi stories). Here the earth is invaded by Martians, and we hear the tale from the point of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ragwaine - LibraryThing

This was entertaining, though I wouldn't say brilliant, obviously ground breaking at the time. The narrator of the story wasn't as much a hero as an observer who was occasionally brave. Wells does a ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter One The Eve of the War
7
Chapter Two The Falling Star
17
Chapter Three On Horsell Common
24
Chapter Four The Cylinder Opens
29
Chapter Five The HeatRay
35
Chapter Six The HeatRay in the Chobham Road
43
Chapter Seven How I Reached Home
48
Chapter Eight Friday Night
55
Chapter Sixteen The Exodus from London
153
Chapter Seventeen The Thunder Child
175
BOOK TWO THE EARTH UNDER THE MARTIANS
191
Chapter One Under Foot
192
Chapter Two What We Saw from the Ruined House
205
Chapter Three The Days of Imprisonment
220
Chapter Four The Death of the Curate
229
Chapter Five The Stillness
237

Chapter Nine The Fighting Begins
60
Chapter Ten In the Storm
71
Chapter Eleven At the Window
81
Chapter Twelve What I Saw of the Destruction of Weybridge and Shepperton
91
Chapter Thirteen How I Fell in with the Curate
110
Chapter Fourteen In London
120
Chapter Fifteen What Had Happened in Surrey
139
Chapter Six The Work of Fifteen Days
242
Chapter Seven The Man on Putney Hill
248
Chapter Eight Dead London
274
Chapter Nine Wreckage
288
Chapter Ten The Epilogue
297
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

H. G. Wells was born in Bromley, England on September 21, 1866. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a draper, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology. He graduated from London University in 1888 and became a science teacher. He also wrote for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. He became an author best known for science fiction novels and comic novels. His science fiction novels include The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Wonderful Visit, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon, and The Food of the Gods. His comic novels include Love and Mr. Lewisham, Kipps: The Story of a Simple Soul, The History of Mr. Polly, and Tono-Bungay. He also wrote several short story collections including The Stolen Bacillus, The Plattner Story, and Tales of Space and Time. He died on August 13, 1946 at the age of 79.

Bibliographic information