Sense and Sensibility

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1902 - 341 pages
 

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Took a While

User Review  - maega - Overstock.com

I ordered Sense and Sensibility along with a waffle maker weird combo I know. The waffle maker arrived about a week before the book did. I gave 4 stars because it took so long for the book to arrive. Otherwise everything was great. Read full review

Sense and sensibility

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Austen is the hot property of the entertainment world with new feature film versions of Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility on the silver screen and Pride and Prejudice hitting the TV airwaves on PBS ... Read full review

Contents

I
II
vii
III
xii
IV
xvi
V
6
VI
10
VII
13
VIII
15
XXVII
125
XXVIII
132
XXIX
138
XXX
143
XXXI
153
XXXII
161
XXXIII
171
XXXIV
179

IX
19
X
22
XI
27
XII
33
XIII
37
XIV
42
XV
49
XVI
53
XVII
60
XVIII
67
XIX
71
XX
76
XXI
85
XXII
91
XXIII
100
XXIV
108
XXV
114
XXVI
120
XXXV
189
XXXVI
197
XXXVII
204
XXXVIII
211
XXXIX
225
XL
235
XLI
240
XLII
247
XLIII
255
XLIV
261
XLV
271
XLVI
287
XLVII
292
XLVIII
301
XLIX
308
L
312
LI
323

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Popular passages

Page 87 - His temper might perhaps be a little soured by finding, like many others of his sex, that through some unaccountable bias in favour of beauty, he was the husband of a very silly woman — but she knew that this kind of blunder was too common for any sensible man to be lastingly hurt by it.
Page 31 - Brandon is just the kind of man," said Willoughby one day, when they were talking of him together, "whom everybody speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to." "That is exactly what I think of him,
Page 13 - On each side of the entrance was a sitting-room, about sixteen feet square ; and beyond them were the offices and the stairs. Four bedrooms and two garrets formed the rest of the house. It had not been built many years, and was in good repair.
Page vii - The family of Dashwood had been long settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where for many generations they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintances.
Page 70 - in a total misapprehension of character in some point or other : fancying people so much more gay or grave, or ingenious or stupid, than they really are, and I can hardly tell why, or in what the deception originated. Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving one's self time to deliberate and judge." "But I thought it was right, Elinor," said Marianne, " to be guided wholly by the opinion of other people.
Page iii - I had forgot her; but she may be 'prenticed out at small cost, and then what does it signify? Delaford is a nice place, I can tell you; exactly what I call a nice old-fashioned place, full of comforts and conveniences; quite shut in with great garden walls that are covered with the best fruit-trees in the country, and such a mulberry tree in one corner! Lord! How Charlotte and I did stuff the only time we were there!
Page 319 - ... to Elinor herself, who had heard so much of it from Colonel Brandon, and heard it with so much attention, as to be entirely mistress of the subject. One question after this only remained undecided between them ; one difficulty only was to be overcome. They were brought together by mutual affection, with the warmest approbation of their real friends ; their intimate knowledge of each other seemed to make their happiness certain, and they only wanted something to live upon. Edward had two thousand...
Page 28 - The same books, the same passages, were idolised by each ; or if any difference appeared, any objection arose, it lasted no longer than till the force of her arguments and the brightness of her eyes could be displayed. He acquiesced in all her decisions, caught all her enthusiasm ; and long before his visit concluded, they conversed with a familiarity of a longestablished acquaintance. " Well, Marianne," said Elinor, as soon as he had left them, " for one morning I think you have done pretty well.
Page 73 - I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. 1 am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower, — and a troop of tidy, happy villagers please me better than the finest banditti in the world.
Page xv - I am convinced within myself that your father had no idea of your giving them any money at all. The assistance he thought of, I dare say, was only such as might be reasonably expected of you ; for instance, such as looking out for a comfortable small house for them, helping them to move their things, and sending them presents of fish and game, and so forth, whenever they are in season.

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