The Cradle of the Republic: Jamestown and James River

Front Cover
Hermitage Press, 1906 - Jamestown (Va.) - 286 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
7
III
11
IV
22
V
30
VI
109
VII
116
VIII
150
IX
153
X
158
XI
164
XII
181
XIII
197
XIV
201
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 116 - ... this was our Church, till wee built a homely thing like a barne, set upon Cratchets, covered with rafts, sedge, and earth, so was also the walls...
Page 99 - WITH PARTICIPATION BY THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Whereas the Congress of the United States of America has duly adopted Public Law 566...
Page 116 - Pulpit a bar of wood nailed to two neighbouring trees, in foule weather we shifted into an old rotten tent, for we had few better...
Page 203 - And the boat returned no more. But oft, from the Indian hunter's camp This lover and maid so true Are seen at the hour of midnight damp. To cross the Lake by a fire-fly lamp. And paddle their white canoe ! MARCHIONESS DOWAGER OF DONEGALL.
Page 99 - In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. "Done in the City of Washington, this...
Page 121 - But forasmuche as men's affaires doe little prosper where God's service is neglected, all the Burgesses tooke their places in the Quire till a prayer was said by Mr. Bucke, the Minister, that it would please God to guide and sanctifie all our proceedings to His owne glory and the good of this Plantation.
Page 99 - And in the name of the Government and of the people of the United States, I do hereby invite all the nations of the earth to take part in the commemoration of an event that is pre-eminent in human history and of lasting interest to mankind...
Page 190 - There are large tracts of land, houses, and other things granted to free schools, for the education of children in many parts of the country ; and some of these are so large, that of themselves they are a handsome maintenance to a master ; but the additional allowance which gentlemen give with their sons, render them a comfortable subsistence. These schools have been founded by the legacies of well inclined gentlemen, and the management of them hath commonly been left to the direction of the county...
Page 110 - ... from his backe an Arrow of an elle long, drew it strongly in his Bowe, shoots the Target a foote thorow, or better : which was strange, being that a Pistoll could not pierce it. Wee seeing the force of his Bowe, afterwards set him up a steele Target ; he shot again, and burst his arrow all to pieces, he presently pulled out another Arrow, and bit it in his teeth, and seemed to bee in a great rage, so hee went away in great anger.
Page 116 - Yet we had daily Common Prayer morning and evening, every Sunday two Sermons, and every three months the holy Communion, till our Minister died: but our Prayers daily, with an Homily on Sundays, we continued two or three years after, till more Preachers came...

Bibliographic information