State and Locality in Mughal India: Power Relations in Western India, C.1572-1730

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 11, 2004 - History - 144 pages
This book presents an exploratory study of the Mughal state and its negotiation with local power relations. By studying the state from the perspective of the localities and not from that of the Mughal Court, it shifts the focus from the imperial grid to the local arenas, and more significantly, from 'form' to 'process'. As a result, the book offers a new interpretation of the system of rule based on an appreciation of the local experience of imperial sovereignty, and the inter-connections between the state and the local power relations. The book knits together the systems- and action-theoretic approaches to power, and presents the Mughal state as a dynamic structure in constant change and conflict. The study, based on hitherto unexamined local evidence, highlights the extent to which the interactions between state and society helped to shape the rule structure, the normative system and 'the moral economy of the state'.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Conquest and sovereignty
12
The system of rule
31
Order and disorder
52
Women kin and sharia
71
The state and the local complexes of power
91
The fiscal system
110
Conclusion
126
Bibliography
132
Index
141
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Farhat Hasan is Reader in History at the Center of Advanced Study in History, Aligarh Muslim University.

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