The Language of the Heart: A Cultural History of the Recovery Movement from Alcoholics Anonymous to Oprah Winfrey

Front Cover
Univ of North Carolina Press, Jan 1, 2010 - Social Science - 376 pages
In The Language of the Heart, Trysh Travis explores the rich cultural history of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its offshoots and the larger "recovery movement" that has grown out of them. Moving from AA's beginnings in the mid-1930s as a men's fellowship that met in church basements to the thoroughly commercialized addiction treatment centers of today, Travis chronicles the development of recovery and examines its relationship to the broad American tradition of self-help, highlighting the roles that gender, mysticism, and bibliotherapy have played in that development.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jewel.Barnett - LibraryThing

It was a great read about the the recovery movement from an outsider. Read full review

Contents

The Sex Addict the Dry Drunk and the Ubiquitous Recovery Movement
1
ADDICITION AND RECOVERY
19
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS AND PRINT CULTURE
105
POLITICS AND SPIRIT
185
Recovery as a Populist Culture
265
Alcoholics Anonymous Membership
273
Reprintings and Distribution of Alcoholics Anonymous
275
Notes
279
Bibliography
319
Index
347
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Trysh Travis is associate professor of women's studies at the University of Florida. She helped to found and now edits Points: the Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society.

Bibliographic information