A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis

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Boni and Liveright, 1920 - Psychoanalysis - 406 pages
 

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Contents

II
III
8
IV
21
V
39
VI
59
VII
61
VIII
76
IX
88
XVIII
205
XIX
207
XX
219
XXI
234
XXII
246
XXIII
260
XXIV
275
XXV
292

X
99
XI
108
XII
120
XIII
139
XIV
151
XV
165
XVI
178
XVII
192
XXVI
309
XXVII
326
XXVIII
338
XXIX
354
XXX
370
XXXI
386
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Page 245 - The second blow fell when biological research destroyed man's supposedly privileged place in creation and proved his descent from the animal kingdom and his ineradicable animal nature. This revaluation has been accomplished in our own days by Darwin, Wallace and their predecessors, though not without the most violent contemporary opposition.
Page 383 - Faith repeats the history of its own origin; it is a derivative of love and at first it needed no arguments. Not until later does it admit them so far as to take them into critical consideration if they have been offered by someone who is loved.
Page 123 - The number of things which are represented symbolically in dreams is not great. The human body as a whole, parents, children, brothers and sisters, birth, death, nakedness — and one thing more.
Page 324 - The artist has also an introverted disposition and has not far to go to become neurotic. He is one who is urged on by instinctual needs which are too clamorous; he longs to attain to honour, power, riches, fame, and the love of women; but he lacks the means of achieving these gratifications.
Page 245 - Humanity has in the course of time had to endure from the hands of science two great outrages upon its naive self-love. The first was when it realized that our earth was not the center of the universe, but only a tiny speck in a world-system...
Page 298 - The measure of unsatisfied libido which the average human being can stand is limited. The plasticity and freedom of movement of libido is by no means retained to the same extent by all individuals; sublimation can, moreover, never account for more than a certain small fraction of the libido, and finally most people possess the capacity for sublimation only to a very slight degree.
Page 172 - Oedipus-complex covers entirely the relation of the child to its parents; this relation can be much more complicated. Furthermore, the Oedipus-complex is more or less well-developed; it may even experience a reversal, but it. is a customary and very important factor in the psychic life of the child; and one tends rather to underestimate than to overestimate...
Page 171 - ... daughter sees in her mother the authority which imposes limits to her will, whose task it is to bring her to that renunciation of sexual freedom which society demands ; in certain cases, too, the mother is still a rival, who objects to being set aside. The same thing is repeated still more blatantly between father and son. To the son the father is the embodiment of the social compulsion to which he so unwillingly submits, the person who stands in the way of his following his own will, of his...
Page 321 - ... reaches beyond his own experience into primaeval experience at points where his own experience has been too rudimentary. It seems to me quite possible that all the things that are told to us to-day in analysis as phantasy — the seduction of children, the inflaming of sexual excitement by observing parental intercourse, the threat of castration (or rather castration itself) — were once real occurrences in the primaeval times of the human family, and that children in their phantasies are simply...
Page 66 - ... reaction to stimuli external to consciousness. Freud says : "However, even if the dream is superfluous, it exists nevertheless and we may try to give an account of its existence. Why does not the psyche go to sleep? Probably because there is something which gives it no rest. Stimuli act upon the psyche, and it must react to them. The dream, therefore, is the way in which the psyche reacts to the stimuli acting upon it in the sleeping condition. We note here a point of approach to the understanding...

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