Walks in London, Volume 2

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Page 289 - Mighty victor, mighty lord ! Low on his funeral couch he lies ! No pitying heart, no eye, afford A tear to grace his obsequies.
Page 239 - Life is a jest, and all things show it, I thought so once, and now I know it.
Page 227 - Proud names, who once the reins of empire held; In arms who triumph'd, or in arts excell'd; Chiefs, graced with scars, and prodigal of blood, Stern patriots who for sacred freedom stood; Just men, by whom impartial laws were given, And saints who taught, and led the way to Heaven.
Page 237 - The rest to some faint meaning make pretence, But Shadwell never deviates into sense.
Page 467 - And now, behold, the hand of the Lord is upon thee, and thou shalt be blind, not seeing the sun for a season. And immediately there fell on him a mist and a darkness ; and he went about seeking some to lead him by the hand.
Page 308 - For ever tomb'd beneath the stone, Where — taming thought to human pride ! — The mighty chiefs sleep side by side. Drop upon Fox's grave the tear, 'Twill trickle to his rival's bier ; O'er PiTT'S the mournful requiem sound, And Fox's shall the notes rebound.
Page 385 - EARTH has not anything to show more fair: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill; Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! The river glideth at his own sweet will:...
Page 129 - Dryden may be properly considered as the father of English criticism ; as the writer who first taught us to determine upon principles the merit of composition. Of our former poets, the greatest dramatist wrote without rules, conducted through life and nature by a genius that rarely misled and rarely deserted him. Of the rest, those who knew the laws of propriety had neglected to teach them.
Page 153 - But that which is to be allowed him, and which very much contributed to cover his defects, is a daring fiery spirit that animates his translation, which is something like what one might imagine Homer himself would have writ before he arrived at years of discretion.
Page 318 - Statesman, yet friend to Truth! of soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honour clear; Who broke no promise, served no private end, Who gained no title, and who lost no friend ; Ennobled by himself, by all approved, And praised, unenvied, by the Muse he loved.

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