Naturalizing Phenomenology: Issues in Contemporary Phenomenology and Cognitive Science

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Stanford University Press, 1999 - Philosophy - 641 pages
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This ambitious work aims to shed new light on the relations between Husserlian phenomenology and the present-day efforts toward a scientific theory of cognition with its complex structure of disciplines, levels of explanation, and conflicting hypotheses.

The book s primary goal is not to present a new exegesis of Husserl s writings, although it does not dismiss the importance of such interpretive and critical work. Rather, the contributors assess the extent to which the kind of phenomenological investigation Husserl initiated favors the construction of a scientific theory of cognition, particularly in contributing to specific contemporary theories either by complementing or by questioning them. What clearly emerges is that Husserlian phenomenology cannot become instrumental in developing cognitive science without undergoing a substantial transformation. Therefore, the central concern of this book is not only the progress of contemporary theories of cognition but also the reorientation of Husserlian phenomenology.

Because a single volume could never encompass the numerous facets of this dual aim, the contributors focus on the issue of naturalization. This perspective is far-reaching enough to allow for the coverage of a great variety of topics, ranging from general structures of intentionality, to the nature of the founding epistemological and ontological principles of cognitive science, to analyses of temporality and perception and the mathematical modeling of their phenomenological description.

This book, then, is a collective reflection on the possibility of utilizing a naturalized Husserlian phenomenology to contribute to a scientific theory of cognition that fills the explanatory gap between the phenomenological mind and brain.

 

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Contents

An Introduction to Naturalizing
1
Part Three The Nature and Limits of Naturalization
80
Intentionality Naturalized?
83
Intentionality
111
Leibhaftigkeit and Representational Theories
148
Movement
156
The Teleological Dimension of Perceptual
196
Husserl in Light of Recent
220
Godel and Husserl
385
From Intuition to Logic
401
Naturalizing Phenomenology? Dretske on Qualia
429
The Immediately Given as Ground and Background
440
When Transcendental Genesis Encounters
464
Sense and Continuum in Husserl
490
Cognitive Psychology and the Transcendental Theory
508
The Movement of the Living as the Originary
525

Temporality
230
Wooden Iron? Husserlian Phenomenology Meets
245
A Neurophenomenology
266
Truth and the Visual Field
317
Morphological Eidetics for a Phenomenology of Perception
330
Formal Structures in the Phenomenology of Motion
372
Historical Roots
539
NOTES
561
BIBLIOGRAPHY
597
INDEX OF PERSONS
631
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Jean Petitot is Directeur d'Etudes at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris. Francisco J. Varela is Directeur de Recherches at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris. Bernard Pachoud is Maître de Conférences at the Université de Picardie. Jean-Michel Roy is Maître de Conférences at the Université Michel de Montaigne (Bordeaux).

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