English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases Collected from the Most Authentic Sources: Alphabetically Arranged and Annotated, with Much Matter Not Previously Published ...

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Reeves and Turner, 1907 - Proverbs, English - 580 pages
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Page 549 - Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky ; Thou dost not bite so nigh As benefits forgot: Though thou the waters warp, Thy sting is not so sharp As friend remembered not.
Page 507 - in before him an old man with a white head, and one that was thought to be little less than an hundred years old. When Mr. Moore saw this aged man, he thought it expedient to hear him say his mind in this matter; for being so old a man, it was likely that he knew most in that
Page 507 - steeple, and I may remember when there was no steeple at all there. And before that Tenterden steeple was in building, there was no manner of talking of any flats or sands that stopped 'up the haven; and therefore, I think that Tenterden steeple is the
Page 416 - or did a sable eloud Turn forth her silver lining on the night ? I did not err ; there does a sable eloud Turn forth her silver lining on the night, And easts
Page 507 - of Goodwin's Sands. For I am an old man, Sir (quoth he) ; I may remember the building of Tenterden steeple, and I may remember when there was no steeple at all there. And before that Tenterden steeple was in building, there was no manner of talking of any
Page 157 - For every evil under the sun, there is a remedy, or there is none : if there be one, try and find it; if there be none, never mind it. For
Page 215 - He that will not sail till all dangers are over, must never put to sea. He that will not sail till he have a full fair wind will lose many a voyage. He that will not stoop for a pin will never be worth a pound.
Page 507 - say most to it, or at leastwise more than any man here assembled. Yea, forsooth, good Mr. Moore, quoth this old man, for I am well nigh an hundred years old, and no man here in this
Page 368 - Pride had rather go out of the way than go behind. Pride is as loud a beggar as want, and a great deal more
Page 158 - For want of a nail the shoe is lost; for want of a shoe the horse is lost ; for want of a horse the rider is lost.

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