Hidden Scholars: Women Anthropologists and the Native American Southwest

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University of New Mexico Press, 1993 - Social Science - 429 pages
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"Women scholars, writers, curators, and philanthropists have played important roles in the study of Native American cultures of the Southwest. For much of the twentieth century, however, their work has been overlooked. The essays in this book, which grew out of the landmark conference known as Daughters of the Desert, help to rectify the appropriation, erasure, disparagement, and invisibility that many women anthropologists have suffered." "A number of essays are biographical or intellectual histories, such as Parezo on Matilda Coxe Stevenson, Hieb on Elsie Clews Parsons, Babcock on Ruth Benedict, Lamphere on Gladys Reichard, and Lange on Esther Goldfrank. Others provide an overview of women archaeologists (Cordell), philanthropists (McGreevy), and popular writers (Tisdale). Still others assess the contributions of women to a particular subfield, such as Sand on the Yaquis and Hinton on women linguists. This volume goes beyond celebration, however, to provide a critical contribution to anthropological history."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contents

NANCY J PAREZO
3
Pioneer Ethnologist
38
LOUIS A HIEB
63
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Nancy J. Parezo is Curator of Ethnology at the Arizona State Museum and, with Barbara Babcock, co-editor of "Daughters of the Desert".

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